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  • 26 votes cast
Mar
9
comment Determine if a positive integer $x$ is a product of a power of 2 and a power of 5. $f(x) = 2^n \cdot 5^n$
MichaelHardy: Thank you. These edits are very helpful in learning/using Latex.
Mar
9
accepted Determine whether the decimal expansion of a rational number is infinite
Mar
9
comment Determine if a positive integer $x$ is a product of a power of 2 and a power of 5. $f(x) = 2^n \cdot 5^n$
Can I also assume the inverse? That is if $x$ in base 10 has a minimum of or exactly $min(m,n)$ trailing zeros, then $x$ is definitely a product of $2^m5^n$?
Mar
9
revised Determine if a positive integer $x$ is a product of a power of 2 and a power of 5. $f(x) = 2^n \cdot 5^n$
added 86 characters in body
Mar
9
comment Determine if a positive integer $x$ is a product of a power of 2 and a power of 5. $f(x) = 2^n \cdot 5^n$
Thanks for pointing that out. Editing the question to reflect them being NOT the same.
Mar
9
comment Determine whether the decimal expansion of a rational number is infinite
Thank you for that explanation. On a related note, here is question about decimal/binary representation of such numbers if you are interested.
Mar
9
asked Determine if a positive integer $x$ is a product of a power of 2 and a power of 5. $f(x) = 2^n \cdot 5^n$
Mar
9
comment Determine whether the decimal expansion of a rational number is infinite
@GerryMyerson: Thanks. Just to confirm, testing the denominator to be a power of 2 or 5 OR like you said a product of a power of 2 and a power of 5. Now I'm wondering if I would have to iterate to test this (similar to how we find factors of large numbers). Or is determining the same possible with a single calculation? Please let me know if you feel this should be posted as a new question.
Mar
9
revised Determine whether the decimal expansion of a rational number is infinite
Changed irrational to rational.
Mar
9
comment Determine whether the decimal expansion of a rational number is infinite
Thanks. I had the terminology incorrect. Yes I am referring to rational numbers (where the decimal part is infinitely repeating such as $1/3$). So for base 10, any fraction whose denominator is not a power of 2 or 5, would produce a never-ending sequence of digits after the decimal. Am I understanding that correctly?
Mar
9
asked Determine whether the decimal expansion of a rational number is infinite
Jan
21
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
20
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
3
comment Amplitude versus time producing unexpected patterns.
@Henning, could you please elaborate on the last paragraph. I'm assuming you are only referring to the visual representation of the data.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
8
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
4
accepted Finding $n$ in $n=ReverseFactorial(x)$ where $x$ is known.
Jan
25
comment Finding $n$ in $n=ReverseFactorial(x)$ where $x$ is known.
@Amzoti: Ouch. I can see what you mean. My case is closer to $101!-100!$. But instead of performing the actual calculation, I wonder if there is some logarithmic scale where I can approximate which two values of $n$ a given number falls between.
Jan
25
revised Finding $n$ in $n=ReverseFactorial(x)$ where $x$ is known.
added 334 characters in body
Jan
25
asked Finding $n$ in $n=ReverseFactorial(x)$ where $x$ is known.