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bio website sites.google.com/site/…
location Fiji
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
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I'm a lecturer of mathematics at the University of the South Pacific. My research interests are in algebraic topology and metric geometry.


Dec
8
answered Why do we need sometimes other structures than mentioned in the theorem to prove theorems?
Dec
7
comment Is a set $U$ consisting of the single point $p$ open or closed?
@EmanuelePaolini yes, of course. The lack of context in the question made me think of continua only.
Dec
7
comment Is a set $U$ consisting of the single point $p$ open or closed?
The singleton $\{x\}$ can be an open set though. In fact, this happens if, and only if, the metric space itself consists of just one point.
Dec
6
revised How to show there is only one homomorphism between $\mathbb Z_{25}$ and $S_4$?
added 16 characters in body; edited title
Dec
6
answered Is there a bijection from $(-\infty,\infty)$ to $[0,1]$?
Dec
6
comment Generated group of 2 element of order 2
@lhf I assumed OP was given the definition (or at least had seen) of $D_n$ using generators and relations, and then, yes, it's quite straightforward.
Dec
6
answered Generated group of 2 element of order 2
Dec
6
comment Cardinality of this set: $A=\{f: \mathbb{R} \rightarrow \mathbb{R} \text{ continuous} : f(\mathbb{Q})\subseteq\mathbb{Q}\}$
it would help if you specify what is unclear about the other answer you mention.
Dec
6
comment Prove if $a$ and $b$ are real numbers, and $a \neq b$ and $a > 0$, $b > 0$, then $\frac{(a+b)}{2} > \sqrt{ab}$
Assumptions do not need to be shown to hold. They are satisfied by assumption.
Dec
6
answered Notation for Subspaces
Dec
4
answered Give examples of two non-isomorphic groups of order $n^2$
Dec
4
reviewed Approve Give examples of two non-isomorphic groups of order $n^2$
Dec
4
comment Has the idea of generalizing the codomain of a metric been seriously considered?
ok @BrianM.Scott, thanks!
Dec
4
comment Has the idea of generalizing the codomain of a metric been seriously considered?
and @BrianM.Scott if you have the time and if you feel like commenting on my note, I'd be very grateful.
Dec
4
comment Has the idea of generalizing the codomain of a metric been seriously considered?
@BrianM.Scott references please?
Dec
4
comment Has the idea of generalizing the codomain of a metric been seriously considered?
The requirement that whatever the codomain of a metric function should be, it should at least be a field is a strange one. Very little of the field structure of $\mathbb R$ is ever used in metric considerations. If one does not insist on having a field, but rather concentrates on the lattice properties one really needs, then every space is metrizable.
Dec
4
comment Has the idea of generalizing the codomain of a metric been seriously considered?
paracompactness of metrizable spaces is not so much a consequence of the shortness of $\mathbb R$, as much as it is a consequence of it being separable.
Dec
4
answered Has the idea of generalizing the codomain of a metric been seriously considered?
Dec
3
comment How would I prove that this function is bijective?
this function is not injective nor surjective.
Dec
3
revised Holomorphic function and real part of a function
deleted 4 characters in body