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May
8
comment How can probabilities be modeled in a universe where time travel is possible?
I think we agree :)
May
8
comment How can probabilities be modeled in a universe where time travel is possible?
just to further strengthen the claims: if instead of a die you'd flip a coin, it appears that with practice it is possible to flip the coin in such a way that the probability of it landing on a side of your preference is significantly larger than $1/2$. Thus, the flipper may actually make a fair coin appear biased (and thus also a biased one appear fair).
May
8
comment How can probabilities be modeled in a universe where time travel is possible?
the point I wanted (but failed) to make is that the frequentists approach is quite artificial in the case of life in the universe. Sure, we can imagine having multiple universes, but such a situation is quite far removed from what we actually mean. A simpler example would be: Suppose I hold coin in one of my hands. I know where it is, but you don't (and assume I chose where to place it at random). From your frequentist point of view, the probability of the coin being in my right hand is $1/2$. But from my point of view, since I know where it is, it is either $0$ or $1$.
May
8
comment How can probabilities be modeled in a universe where time travel is possible?
I must disagree there @fgp. The frequentist interpretation of probabilities is not the only one. Probabilities can also be seen as expressing levels of certainty. Quite often, as in the case of rolling a die and life in the universe, both interpretations make sense. But (which is my claim), for rolling a die the frequentists approach is very suitable, while for life in the universe the frequentists approach is less appropriate (though I'm not saying it is wrong). Such debates tend to ignite world wars between pure frequentists and pure Baysians. Jaynes is showing a sane middle way.
May
8
answered How can probabilities be modeled in a universe where time travel is possible?
May
8
answered Is there a simple way to illustrate that Fermat's Last Theorem is plausible?
May
8
comment Green's theorem: does clockwise vs counterclockwise matter?
changing direction changes the sign of the integral.
May
8
comment Left and Right inverses of linear operators
yes, that is exactly what I said.
May
8
answered Left and Right inverses of linear operators
May
8
comment Is T an isomorphism?
then you should have tagged the question as homework, provided your answer, and ask for feedback on it.
May
8
comment Is T an isomorphism?
is this homework?
May
7
comment Are proofs in geometry rigorous?
I see @rghthndsd and agree. Thank you for the clarification :)
May
5
awarded  Nice Answer
May
5
comment Proving that operations give equal results given equal inputs
I don't quite understand what the problem is. If $a=b$ then you may interchange $a$ and $b$ since they are the same. They are just different letters representing the same thing. Thus, $a\cdot c=b\cdot c$. QED.
May
5
comment How to find the limiting sum?
Use the Taylor series for $\cos x$.
May
5
revised Show that the function is discontinuous in $\mathbb{R}$
edited title
May
4
comment Are proofs in geometry rigorous?
Yes, well, the Elements need to be read in context, filling in some axioms that were not stated explicitly but appear, both explicitly and implicitly, in the arguments used. As said, using modern standard, we would have done things differently.
May
4
comment Are proofs in geometry rigorous?
@studiosus I believe the question was how does one rigorously establish results in geometry, regardless of a particular property to prove. I find the question meaningful.
May
4
revised Are proofs in geometry rigorous?
added 1348 characters in body
May
4
answered Are proofs in geometry rigorous?