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location Fiji
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I'm a lecturer of mathematics at the University of the South Pacific. My research interests are in algebraic topology and metric geometry.


1d
reviewed Close problem related with probability
1d
reviewed Leave Closed Probability of a particular assignment out of all possible assignments.
2d
comment Could “$\infty$” be understood by taking the reciprocals of the Hyperreal numbers?
and it should be stressed that $\infty $ is still an entity that does not exist. For every non-zero infinitesimal in the hyperreal system, its reciprocal is an infinitely large number. Conversely, for every infinitely large number, its reciprocal is a non-zero infinitesimal. This correspondence is bijective.
2d
comment Problems whose first solutions had been using Calculus but later was shown to be done by non-Calculus methods
Liouville's theorem givres criteria for the existence of an elementary antiderivative, it does not give methods for finding it. Modern techniques of integration have little to do with Liouville's theorem and I think this answer does not address OP's question.
2d
answered Why do we need to learn Set Theory?
2d
comment Problems whose first solutions had been using Calculus but later was shown to be done by non-Calculus methods
yes, but none of those methods proves Liouville's theorem.
2d
comment Why do we need to learn Set Theory?
are you referring to axiomatic set theory, or naive set theory?
2d
comment Problems whose first solutions had been using Calculus but later was shown to be done by non-Calculus methods
are you sure the reference you gave is for a non-analytical proof of Liouville's theorem? I believe you reference the original, which is very analytical, as you say. So, I'm still unclear how this is an answer to OP's question.
2d
comment Problems whose first solutions had been using Calculus but later was shown to be done by non-Calculus methods
I'm entirely unclear which result you claim here as an answer to OP's question. Is it Liouville's theorem or certain techniques of integration?
2d
comment Problems whose first solutions had been using Calculus but later was shown to be done by non-Calculus methods
Can you provide a reference to a non-calculus proof of Liouville's theorem?
2d
revised Vector space and form?
added 6 characters in body
2d
awarded  Constituent
Dec
18
comment Why do repeated linear factors have to be dealt with in this way?
is it a philosophical question? like why is $2+3\ne 4$?
Dec
18
comment Why do repeated linear factors have to be dealt with in this way?
you say yourself that you know it doesn't work, and then you ask why you can't do that? Well, you can't do it because it does not work.
Dec
17
answered Vector space and form?
Dec
17
comment concepts which is present in metric space but not in topological space
Yes @KevinCarlson , a typical element p in \Omega(S), for any set S, is a collection of finite subsets of $S$ which is down closed, i.e., if a set is there, then any subset of it is there too.
Dec
17
comment concepts which is present in metric space but not in topological space
arxiv.org/abs/1311.4940 is the note.
Dec
17
revised concepts which is present in metric space but not in topological space
added 2 characters in body
Dec
17
answered concepts which is present in metric space but not in topological space
Dec
17
comment concepts which is present in metric space but not in topological space
and just to be a bit more precise, completeness is a uniform property, not a metric one. And even more precise is that completeness is a Cauchy property, not a uniform one.