37,417 reputation
446105
bio website sites.google.com/site/…
location Fiji
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen 14 hours ago

I'm a lecturer of mathematics at the University of the South Pacific. My research interests are in algebraic topology and metric geometry.


Jul
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
16
answered What is an ordered pair actually?
Jul
15
answered Math class exercises
Jul
15
answered surjective, but not injective linear transformation
Jul
15
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
@GerryMyerson but one would not postulate an assumption one already knows to be false just in order to establish that it is false.
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
@GerryMyerson I'm all for creativity but can you imagine a real number whose square is $-1$? Is it worth contemplating such a number (given our knowledge today. I'm not disputing that before the reals were axiomatized properly and before complex numbers were discovered, such contemplation could very will be necessary.)
Jul
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
14
comment Determinant of complex matrix
yes, same calculation but with complex numbers.
Jul
14
comment Is the (type)class `Functor` itself a functor?
your question is not about mathematics. It is about programming paradigms.
Jul
14
comment Is the (type)class `Functor` itself a functor?
you should ask this question on a forum for programming.
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
I can certainly imagine a situation where I don't have all the information yet some oracle does (at least have more information than I do) and that asking the oracles has a cost which may be factored in to an algorithm. But I can't possibly imagine an oracle choosing integers uniformly at random.
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
@julianfernandez I have a hard time imagining something I know does not exist. I had a hard enough time trying to imagine it before I knew it did not exist. I don't intend to start trying to imagine things that do not exist. I see no point in doing so.
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
@julianfernandez the axiom of choice has absolutely nothing to do with probabilities. Your machine that "picks truly randomly" simply does not exist (regardless of the axiom of choice).
Jul
14
answered What does $a = b$ mean when $a, b \in S$
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
@Gina I have nothing against finitely additive probability. I'm just saying that I don't see how it has anything to do with the stated paradox. In particular, notice that the ordinary axiomatization of probabilities certainly allows for positive probabilities on infinite sets while each atom has probability $0$. I just don't see where the added generality of finitely additive measures comes into play here.
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
the paradox relies on a uniform distribution (uniform on all points that is). No such thing exists on a an infinite set except for the uniformly $0$ distribution. According to that distribution (however you wish to relate it to probability) any outcome should surprise you immensely. The paradox is dead.
Jul
14
comment Linear algebra proof
is the projection operator linear?
Jul
14
answered Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
Jul
13
revised What is category theory useful for?
added 1 character in body
Jul
13
awarded  metric-spaces