10,046 reputation
72249
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 20 mins ago

Feb
7
revised Proof: If m is an integer not equal to 0, then m is not divisible by 0.
rolled back to a previous revision
Feb
5
revised $\Psi_g(A)=\Phi(g)A^t\Phi(g)$; express $\chi_\Psi$ through $\chi_\Phi$
$$ in titles considered harmful
Feb
5
revised The integral $\int \frac{\sin^3(x)}{\cos^4(x)}\,dx$
added 10 characters in body
Feb
5
revised The integral $\int \frac{\sin^3(x)}{\cos^4(x)}\,dx$
edited title
Feb
4
awarded  Steward
Feb
4
reviewed Leave Closed ℝ is closed and bounded in the metric
Feb
4
reviewed Looks OK Multivariable Calculus Length of Curve
Feb
4
reviewed Looks OK Projective closure of an algebraic curve as a compactification of Riemann surface
Feb
4
reviewed Looks OK Element of a sequence notation
Feb
3
reviewed Looks OK prove that $A^n$=$0$ for some integer $n$
Feb
3
revised Solving for r in the equation $\int_{0}^{13} \frac{230}{(t+1)^{r} } dt = 375$
shrinking height of title
Feb
3
comment Why are so many of the oldest unsolved problems in mathematics about number theory?
I'm not convinced there's anything very mathematical going on here (though there might be; I'm not even remotely a number theorist). In order for an unsolved problem to be $n$ years old, it has to be from a field people were studying $n$ years ago. This gives number theory an obvious advantage in terms of age of unsolved problems over, say, algebraic topology.
Feb
2
reviewed Reopen Help me to Prove that log2 3 is irrational.
Feb
2
revised Functional Equation : $f(x) = f(x + y^2 + f(y))$
added 746 characters in body
Feb
2
reviewed Reopen Stokes Theorem (Application)
Feb
2
comment Functional Equation : $f(x) = f(x + y^2 + f(y))$
Unless $f(0)=0$...
Feb
2
answered Functional Equation : $f(x) = f(x + y^2 + f(y))$
Feb
1
comment Is $n! = o(n^n)$?
By basic properties of logs: $\log(3^n)=n\log(3)$, and $\log(2^n)=n\log(2)$. (Alternately—and equivalently—you could think of it as a version of the change-of-base formula.)
Feb
1
answered Is $n! = o(n^n)$?
Feb
1
reviewed Close Let $T:\mathbb R^2\to\mathbb R^2$ defined by $T(x,y) =(x,0)$ all $x,y\in \mathbb R$. Is $T$ open?