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Jun
25
revised Showing that $\lim\limits_{n\to\infty}x_n$ exists, where $x_{n} = \sqrt{1 + \sqrt{2 + \sqrt{3 + …+\sqrt{n}}}}$
Added $-signs to show LaTeX.
Jun
25
suggested approved edit on Showing that $\lim\limits_{n\to\infty}x_n$ exists, where $x_{n} = \sqrt{1 + \sqrt{2 + \sqrt{3 + …+\sqrt{n}}}}$
Jun
24
comment Interesting Math for 3-graders
Yes, it is not exactly easy to see by youself - especially not when you're a 3rd-grader. But it is very easy to see that each of the yellow circles corresponds to precisely one way of choosing two purple circles! Telling them, without giving any insight in why it is so, that $\binom{n}{2}$ describes the number of ways to choose two purple circles, would (should (could)) complete their understanding of this proof. Showing them, then, another simple geometric proof of this identity (does it have a name?) would really show the beauty of math; that the same thing can be said in many different ways
Jun
24
answered Interesting Math for 3-graders
Jun
23
comment Infinite divisibility of random variable vs. distribution
Thank you very much! Should I delete my "question"?
Jun
23
comment Infinite divisibility of random variable vs. distribution
Then there is none. This link says otherwise, which had me confused.
Jun
23
asked Infinite divisibility of random variable vs. distribution
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
22
comment Understanding Fourier Transform and FFT
Thanks - I will take a look!
Nov
22
answered scale and ratio : try to find x,y,width,height
Nov
22
comment Understanding Fourier Transform and FFT
That is exactly the situation, yes!
Nov
22
awarded  Student
Nov
22
asked Understanding Fourier Transform and FFT
May
8
comment What are some examples of a mathematical result being counterintuitive?
Well, it might not be directly related to fractal geometry, I guess. I heard of it in a fractal geometry course. The thing about it is, that it is possible to rotate the needle in a set of Lebesgue measure 0, but Hausdorff dimension 2. The latter takes fractal geometry to prove.
May
7
comment What are some examples of a mathematical result being counterintuitive?
I heard about it in a Fractal Geometry-course. Funny result. In general, I think fractal geometry takes some getting used to. Fx the notion of Hausdorff-dimension. It is somewhat counterintuitive to me that a set, such as the Cantor Set can have irrational Hausdorff dimension (here ln 2/ ln 3), even if it is a subset of R, and has Lebesgue measure 0.
May
6
awarded  Teacher
May
6
answered What are some examples of a mathematical result being counterintuitive?