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Nov
8
comment Why is negative times negative = positive?
The problem with this question is that the honest answer is that we basically just want to define multiplication such that $\mathbb Z$ is a ring, but an 8 year old isn't really ready to hear that. There is no way of proving it intuitively because there is no way to define negative number multiplication intuitively.
Nov
8
comment What is the correct statement of the “Poisson limit theorem”?
@a... But in the example given underneath, $p$ would be fixed (or $p_n$ would be a constant sequence, if you prefer).
Nov
8
revised What is the correct statement of the “Poisson limit theorem”?
added 5 characters in body
Nov
8
revised What kind of mathematics do I need to solve for a sequence of operations to get from one state to another?
edited tags
Nov
8
answered What kind of mathematics do I need to solve for a sequence of operations to get from one state to another?
Nov
8
asked What is the correct statement of the “Poisson limit theorem”?
Nov
8
answered What groups can I safely refer to, to demonstrate various theorems in a first course in abstract algebra?
Nov
7
comment Much less than, what does that mean?
@avid19 I think your answer really just says the same thing as this one does. Although I think your answer is insightful, I certainly wouldn't call your approach "a way to make it rigorous" - it's not like you've given a mathematical definition for the symbol $\ll$ as a binary relation on the set $\mathbb R$.
Nov
7
comment Isomorphism to a finite field
What exactly is the ring $S$?
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
4
revised Are these subsets of the powerset P(N) countable?
edited tags
Nov
4
answered Are these subsets of the powerset P(N) countable?
Nov
3
comment What does it mean for two functions to be orthogonal?
Why do you so blithely accept orthogonality in $\mathbb R^n$? You can't exactly visualize that, either.
Nov
3
comment Did the invention of group theory help at all in the way we look at complex analysis?
You may be interested in the History of Mathematics site.
Nov
3
comment Measure Theory ; why it works?
@B.S.Thomson Well, let's just say that measure theory is one of the most obvious and natural approaches to defining Lebesgue's integral. Once you realize you're going to need to know the length of $f^{-1}(I)$ it's natural to start trying to work out a general theory of which subsets of $\mathbb R$ have a notion of length so that you can work out for which $f$ your theory applies. In any case, I think this is why measure theory was originally developped.
Nov
3
comment Find limit of two interrelated sequences
Well, there's always $$a_{n+1}=\frac 1 {\sum_0^n a_k} - \sqrt 2$$.
Nov
3
answered Measure Theory ; why it works?
Nov
3
comment Showing that the sequence of functions is not Cauchy
@Did The main to task is to show $g_n$ does not converge uniformly at all. Here this is reduced to showing that $g_n$ specifically does not converge uniformly to $f$.
Nov
3
comment Writing proofs properly.
What does it mean to say that "the records in the record book should be in order of non-decreasing date"? Do you mean that if $n>m$, then the $n$-th subject should be taken after the $m$-th subject?
Nov
3
revised Writing proofs properly.
added 4 characters in body