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1d
comment Group theoretic solution to an IMO problem
Why do you think there's a group theoretic solution? Just because there's a natural bijection between the vertices of a pentagon and the group of order $5$?
Dec
18
comment Show that the Axioms are satisfied
I downvoted because the author was apparently so uninterested in whether others would be able to understand their question that they didn't even notice they never said what "BA1, BA2 and BA3" are.
Dec
16
comment Artin Chapter 11, Exercise 9.12, polynomials without common zeroes
Why do you call the first method an "algebraic geometry" method? It seems like simple algebraic manipulation to me. Is it because of the corollary you used?
Dec
6
accepted How can using a different definition for the integral be useful?
Dec
6
comment Why does the sum of the reciprocals of factorials converge to $e$?
There are convergence problems here. That each term of a sum converges to a limit doesn't immediately tell you that the limit of the finite sums is the infinite sum of the limits.
Dec
3
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
1
asked How can using a different definition for the integral be useful?
Dec
1
comment Extremely tough limit proof for f(x) and g(x)
@Amad27 The original conditions gave something that worked for any $\epsilon$. I am applying these conditions for a specific value, that being $\epsilon/2$ - maybe I should have used different notation, because my $\epsilon$ is not the same as the one in the original conditions. You do this any time you want to apply a theorem to a specific case. If you have the theorem $a^2+b^2=c^2$ for a right triangle with sides $a,b,c$, then to apply that to a triangle with sides $x,y,z$, you have to replace $a,b,c$ with $x,y,z$ in the original theorem.
Dec
1
comment Monstrous Diophantine Equation
This is aesthetically pleasing, but I don't feel it really answers the question. I'm still just as in the dark as to how to solve this problem, since you didn't explain how you came up with that factorization.
Nov
22
revised Solving $(1-x)^3 = -1$ over the complex field
deleted 1 character in body; edited title
Nov
21
comment Are all the finite dimensional vector spaces with a metric isometric to $\mathbb R^n$
When you ask questions like these, always make sure all the different properties are tied together. You should have easily spotted the problem from the fact that you're talking about "finite dimensional vector spaces with a metric" - but a metric doesn't care about the vetor space structure, so the requirement that your set be a vector space is immediately forgotten.
Nov
20
revised Why is negative times negative = positive?
deleted 148 characters in body
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
18
reviewed Edit If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
Nov
18
revised If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
Fixed a couple of minor errors.
Nov
18
revised If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
added 2 characters in body
Nov
18
comment Most ambiguous and inconsistent phrases and notations in maths
This is the one abuse of notation that I refuse to take part in. Many of the ones mentioned by Git Gud can genuinely simplify your writing, but is it really so hard to just write $(\sin x)^2$? It's two parentheses!
Nov
17
answered If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
Nov
16
comment If a,b,c are three distinct real numbers
@Integrator It actually won't... notice SE doesn't show accept rate anymore.
Nov
15
revised Extremely tough limit proof for f(x) and g(x)
added 38 characters in body