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Nov
22
revised Solving $(1-x)^3 = -1$ over the complex field
deleted 1 character in body; edited title
Nov
21
comment Are all the finite dimensional vector spaces with a metric isometric to $\mathbb R^n$
When you ask questions like these, always make sure all the different properties are tied together. You should have easily spotted the problem from the fact that you're talking about "finite dimensional vector spaces with a metric" - but a metric doesn't care about the vetor space structure, so the requirement that your set be a vector space is immediately forgotten.
Nov
20
revised Why is negative times negative = positive?
deleted 148 characters in body
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
18
reviewed Edit suggested edit on If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
Nov
18
revised If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
Fixed a couple of minor errors.
Nov
18
revised If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
added 2 characters in body
Nov
18
comment Most ambiguous and inconsistent phrases and notations in maths
This is the one abuse of notation that I refuse to take part in. Many of the ones mentioned by Git Gud can genuinely simplify your writing, but is it really so hard to just write $(\sin x)^2$? It's two parentheses!
Nov
17
answered If the number $x$ is algebraic, then $x^2$ is also algebraic
Nov
16
comment If a,b,c are three distinct real numbers
@Integrator It actually won't... notice SE doesn't show accept rate anymore.
Nov
15
revised Extremely tough limit proof for f(x) and g(x)
added 38 characters in body
Nov
15
comment Extremely tough limit proof for f(x) and g(x)
@Amad27 It basically is, but replacing "$\epsilon$" with "$\epsilon/2$".
Nov
15
answered Why don't we need to check for associativity for a subgroup?
Nov
15
answered Extremely tough limit proof for f(x) and g(x)
Nov
10
comment Subtracting Quarters of Squares Equals Multiply?!
@Johanna Huh? Of course it's a good proof. They's not starting off by assuming equality, they're showing that the first equation is equivalent to the last.
Nov
9
comment A thought on Ancient Math
I think this question is too broad. Can you at least specify a period and country?
Nov
5
comment Why does convergence in law not worry about points of discontinuity?
I guess the trouble is that this is basically a subjective question... to me it's not intuitively clear that $X_n\to X$, since as you say, their laws disagree for certain events.
Nov
5
comment Why does convergence in law not worry about points of discontinuity?
@sanjab Perhaps I should have mentioned that I don't really understand the point of the example. Given that $F_n(0)=0$ for all $0$ but $F(0)=1$, I would find it more natural to just conclude that there isn't convergence in law. I don't see how the example is supposed to motivate changing the definition.
Nov
5
asked Why does convergence in law not worry about points of discontinuity?
Nov
4
comment $\pi$ normal to the base $10$
Well, because it's an immediate consequence of the definition of "normal". Are you sure that's the question you wanted to ask?