102 reputation
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age 22
visits member for 1 years, 11 months
seen Jun 20 '13 at 18:41

I'm a dev bi***


Nov
15
comment How to compute large modulos with pen and paper?
Oh right ! Thanks
Nov
15
revised How to compute large modulos with pen and paper?
edited body
Nov
15
comment How to compute large modulos with pen and paper?
I don't see what number is multiple of 3 in the first case.
Nov
15
comment How to compute large modulos with pen and paper?
I notice the pattern for the first one. But I can't prove why it's accurate to predict so.
Nov
14
asked How to compute large modulos with pen and paper?
Nov
14
accepted Fastest way to compute [1234567890]_200 with pen and paper
Nov
14
awarded  Commentator
Nov
14
comment Fastest way to compute [1234567890]_200 with pen and paper
Sorry about that. Seems like the previous notation wasn't an international standard. But it was $[1234567890]_200$ which is the number in base 200 and hence similar once reduced to the modulo.
Nov
14
awarded  Editor
Nov
14
revised Fastest way to compute [1234567890]_200 with pen and paper
added 2 characters in body
Nov
14
comment Fastest way to compute [1234567890]_200 with pen and paper
Right. Thanks ! That was the simplification I was looking for.
Nov
14
asked Fastest way to compute [1234567890]_200 with pen and paper
May
7
accepted Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument
May
7
comment Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument
Thanks for the help. This cleared things up !
May
7
comment Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument
Alright. Thanks.
May
7
comment Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument
$(k+l) \times (k-l) = k^2 - l^2$
May
7
comment Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument
I see how you could use this as an algebraic proof but I don't think this can be used to prove it using a combinatorial argument.
May
7
comment Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument
I don't see exactly where this is heading. I can agree on the fact of splitting the initial $2k$ items group into two smaller ones but I don't get were the $k^2$ and $l^2$ are coming from
May
7
accepted Inductive Proof of a countable set Cartesian product
May
7
asked Proof of a Binomial Identity using a combinatorial argument