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seen Jun 19 at 14:54

Jan
23
accepted Why implication ($\phi x \Rightarrow \psi x$) is always true according to Russell?
Jan
23
comment Why implication ($\phi x \Rightarrow \psi x$) is always true according to Russell?
Hi @PeterSmith. If I understand T(a) = "if a is human, a is mortal" is a PF of the form $\phi x \Rightarrow \psi x$. Now what Russell says is that T(a) is always true and he is not talking about all of the PFs of the form $\phi x \Rightarrow \psi x$. Am I right?
Jan
23
asked Why implication ($\phi x \Rightarrow \psi x$) is always true according to Russell?
Dec
9
accepted What does Russell mean when he defines the “Posterity… with respect to the immediate predecessor”?
Dec
7
awarded  Editor
Dec
7
revised What does Russell mean when he defines the “Posterity… with respect to the immediate predecessor”?
I modified and described my example in two stages
Dec
7
awarded  Supporter
Dec
7
comment What does Russell mean when he defines the “Posterity… with respect to the immediate predecessor”?
Am I wrong when I say that 5 belongs to {0,1,2...}?. Now, since 5 belongs to {0,1,2...} which is hereditary, then {0,1,2...} is the posterity of 5.
Dec
7
comment What does Russell mean when he defines the “Posterity… with respect to the immediate predecessor”?
Thanks @peter. I think that I understand your post, but I still missing something. When Russell says: "all those terms that belong to every hereditary class to which the given number belongs". I need an example. For example given 5. I want to identify the classes that satisfy the definition. After that, identify the members in order to form the posterity.
Dec
6
comment What does Russell mean when he defines the “Posterity… with respect to the immediate predecessor”?
I understand when you say 0 does not belong to the posterity of 5. Please, tell me how did you find the posterity of 5?
Dec
6
asked What does Russell mean when he defines the “Posterity… with respect to the immediate predecessor”?
Apr
30
awarded  Scholar
Apr
30
accepted Proof for the funky trace derivative : $d (\operatorname{trace} (ABA'C))$?
Apr
29
comment Proof for the funky trace derivative : $d (\operatorname{trace} (ABA'C))$?
Hi leslie. Now, I understand that proof. Your explanations was very clear. I didn't see matrix calculus and I think the matrix notation was confusing me. Thank you so much.
Apr
29
awarded  Student
Apr
29
asked Proof for the funky trace derivative : $d (\operatorname{trace} (ABA'C))$?