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May
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awarded  Nice Question
Mar
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
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awarded  Notable Question
Sep
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Jan
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Nov
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May
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comment What is the name of the quadrilateral shape described by two radii and two arcs?
It's a trapezoid in polar coordinates :)
Mar
6
accepted What is the name of the function $f(k) = \text{max}(k,0)$ on $\mathbb Z$?
Mar
6
asked What is the name of the function $f(k) = \text{max}(k,0)$ on $\mathbb Z$?
Feb
26
accepted Traditional axes in 3d Mathematica plots?
Jan
6
answered Traditional axes in 3d Mathematica plots?
Jan
5
comment Traditional axes in 3d Mathematica plots?
In general no, but I would like them to be drawn by the system rather than adding them in by hand (with Graphics[] directives); I don't want to have to specify the length of the arrows every time.
Jan
5
awarded  Commentator
Jan
5
comment Traditional axes in 3d Mathematica plots?
That's 50% of what I'm looking for - do you know if it's possible to cut off the negative bits, so that the axes are rays instead of lines?
Jan
5
asked Traditional axes in 3d Mathematica plots?
Dec
2
comment Re-arranging a complex equation
As was pointed out in your other question, "make d the subject" will be more understood if you say "solve for d"
Dec
2
comment Re-arranging a complex equation
Try reading the FAQ before posting (always a good idea in any online community): meta.math.stackexchange.com/questions/107/…
Dec
2
answered Cohomological decomposition of tensor sheaves?
Nov
26
comment Which geometric distribution to use?
Geometric always means "the number of trials before the state changes", i.e. from success to failure or vise-versa, and you have to interpret it according to what is being described. Given the simplicity of the distribution, the one to which an author is referring is almost always obvious after a second of thought.