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  • 78 votes cast
Mar
9
asked Proving a statement by contradiction
Mar
1
accepted Understanding the intuition behind math
Feb
26
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
26
comment Understanding the intuition behind math
Excellent answer. I will definitely take your advice!
Feb
26
comment Understanding the intuition behind math
Well I'm currently studying derivatives of vector valued functions. If you ask me to solve a problem, I'll do it for you. But if you ask me to tell you what it means and how can it be used, then I'll have absolutely no idea. I passed Calc II with an A last semester, but I have no idea what I learned. Its like a blackout to me, as if I were drunk and studying math.
Feb
26
accepted Finding parametric and symmetric equations for a line
Feb
26
accepted Parametrization of a line
Feb
26
asked Understanding the intuition behind math
Feb
18
comment Finding parametric and symmetric equations for a line
Sorry I'm not really understanding your answer..
Feb
18
asked Finding parametric and symmetric equations for a line
Feb
15
comment Parametrization of a line
How has my equation been reduced to one variable with parametrization?
Feb
15
comment Parametrization of a line
But so whats the difference between using x and t in the equation?
Feb
15
asked Parametrization of a line
Feb
15
accepted Determining if a line is orthogonal to a plane
Feb
15
comment Determining if a line is orthogonal to a plane
@Arturo any idea about the parametrization of the plane?
Feb
15
comment Determining if a line is orthogonal to a plane
and what about for finding the parametrization of the plane?
Feb
15
comment Determining if a line is orthogonal to a plane
So it'd be $<2,3,5>X<-4,-12,18>$?
Feb
15
revised Determining if a line is orthogonal to a plane
added 153 characters in body
Feb
15
comment Determining if a line is orthogonal to a plane
Oh well I already knew the normal vector of the plane, $<2,3,5>$, and now the normal vector of the line (if I can call it that) is just $<1,0,2>$?
Feb
15
accepted Why is Euler's Identity stated the way it is?