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 Yearling
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Apr
21
awarded  Yearling
Apr
5
accepted Support of the density of a transformation of a random variable $Y = \frac{1}{X}$ with $f_X(x) = \frac{1}{\pi(1+x^2)}$
Mar
31
comment Computing hitting times from the stationary distribution
@Did duly noted
Mar
31
revised Computing hitting times from the stationary distribution
added 879 characters in body
Mar
31
comment Computing hitting times from the stationary distribution
@Math1000 hopefully my edit helps to clarify. Let me know if you need more.
Mar
31
revised Computing hitting times from the stationary distribution
added 136 characters in body
Mar
30
asked Computing hitting times from the stationary distribution
Mar
27
asked Support of the density of a transformation of a random variable $Y = \frac{1}{X}$ with $f_X(x) = \frac{1}{\pi(1+x^2)}$
Apr
21
awarded  Yearling
Feb
21
accepted scores of individuals and evaluation
Jan
3
comment Proof that this set is convex set
You need to define your set properly for anyone to understand the question.
Jan
3
revised Proof that this set is convex set
mathjax improvement
Jan
3
suggested approved edit on Proof that this set is convex set
Jan
3
comment Eigenvectors of normal matrix
Thanks @pre-kidney
Jan
3
comment Eigenvectors of normal matrix
Please add some context or some attempt to solve this.
Dec
24
comment A probability function is determined on a dense set- Where is density used in the following proof?
The fact that there is guaranteed to be an $x' \in D$ such that $x' > x$ is a use of the density of $D$ in $\mathbb{R}$.
Dec
24
comment A probability function is determined on a dense set- Where is density used in the following proof?
When it says "Given $\epsilon > 0$, there exists $x' \in D, x'>x$ such that $$F(x) + \epsilon \geq F_D(x')$$"
Dec
24
revised scores of individuals and evaluation
edited body
Dec
24
comment scores of individuals and evaluation
You're right, that's not what I looking for, let me edit that
Dec
24
comment scores of individuals and evaluation
Yes and $\max\{p_m \in \mathcal{T}\} = 9$ as well. But is this always true? - what if we take a larger terrain, say $\mathcal{T}'$ with $m \in \{1,2,...,2000\}$ with each agent $i$, $H_i = \{h_{i1}, h_{i2}, ..., h_{ik}\}$ for some $k \in \mathbb{N}$.