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 Yearling
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Apr
23
comment Algebraic number theory topics for undergrads
Sure.... sure. I thought that you meant you want them to include the study of elliptic curves and other deep results from algebra that only specialists know
Apr
23
comment Algebraic number theory topics for undergrads
first undergraduate algebra course having FLT? WTF!
Apr
21
asked Direct sum of Abelian groups and Isomorphism
Apr
20
comment Probability distribution for a random walk in arbitrary dimension
Is time continuous or discreet? What textbook are you using? Mathematically.... what is a lattice constant? Why should what you wrote be the appropriate distribution? What do the brackets in $\langle \delta_{R(r),r} \rangle$ mean? This is just a thought... but maybe if you think $\mathbb{R}^d$ as $\mathbb{R}\times... \times \mathbb{R}$ then you can answer your questions since apparently you have it resolved for $d=1$. In my notation above, I mean to emphasize that this walk is really a simultaneous walk of $d$ 1-dimensional walks.
Apr
19
awarded  Yearling
Apr
10
asked Book recommendation for Choquet theory
Apr
9
revised continuity of monotone increasing function which is defined on all of R
deleted 4 characters in body
Apr
4
comment Period of a module vs element
I'm also not sure the map $m\mapsto t_im$ makes sense? I don't understand if $m$ goes to $t_i m $ then when would the case $j\neq i$ occur? I'm just lost in notation.
Apr
4
comment Period of a module vs element
I'm a bit lost lost why coprime implies $(l_i,l_j)=D$, in fact I'm not sure I understand what $(l_i,l_j)$ means. Is this the same as $\langle l_i,l_j \rangle$? In any case, what do you mean by your notation?
Apr
4
comment Period of a module vs element
Yes, I guess as long as that's the case that helps a little. Still not seeing the rest of the question. I'll work on it for a little and if I get something I'll post it as an answer.
Apr
4
comment Period of a module vs element
No, lol. I'm not sure if per(M) ={d|d.x=0 for all x in M} is appropriate, because here it's a set and later in the notes (about 10 pages later) it becomes an element (I believe a rational number). In any case, I think it would help to show the "easy exercise" and the centered equation since I'm confused on the defintion; knowing the definition and seeing a clean proof where it is used will absolutely help (these are quite poorly written notes unfortunately)
Apr
4
revised Period of a module vs element
deleted 2 characters in body
Apr
4
asked Period of a module vs element
Apr
4
reviewed Reviewed What are the distances from a line to the tangents of a circle?
Apr
4
reviewed Edit What is the reciprocal of $(-1/2)^k$?
Apr
4
revised What is the reciprocal of $(-1/2)^k$?
added 2 characters in body
Apr
1
comment Physically impossible to find the constant
To say it's "physically" impossible is nonsensical.
Apr
1
comment Proof that $A$ and $B$ nonempty and closed in $\Bbb C$ means that $A\cup B$ is closed in $\Bbb C$ verification
I've read it. Common sense tells me that this isn't a proof because proving that the $\mathbb{C}-(A\cup B)$ is open is just as hard as proving $A\cup B$ is closed. Your proof should rely on something more fundamental, not something equivalent in difficulty and that is logically equivalent. This answer isn't something that Incurrence didn't already know.
Apr
1
comment Proof that $A$ and $B$ nonempty and closed in $\Bbb C$ means that $A\cup B$ is closed in $\Bbb C$ verification
This isn't a proof to the question, but rather a simple corollary.
Mar
30
revised Let $\{p_1, . . . , p_l\}$ be points in $\mathbb{R}^n$ . Show that the set $U = \mathbb{R}^n\setminus \{p_1, p_2, . . . , p_l\}$ is open.
added 205 characters in body