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location USA
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visits member for 2 years
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PhD

Interests:

Ring and module theory

Clifford algebra/Geometric algebra

Mathematical physics

Applications of abstract algebra


Apr
15
revised Determining and enforcing linear dependence
added 490 characters in body
Apr
15
comment Determining and enforcing linear dependence
@dkar You don't have to store the orthogonal vectors, this is just a means to see if they are independent or not. Added some more stuff to try to clarify that.
Apr
15
comment Determining and enforcing linear dependence
I appreciate the edit, but it did not really explain what measure of "close" you are using. Do you have a particular one in mind?
Apr
15
answered Determining and enforcing linear dependence
Apr
15
comment Determining and enforcing linear dependence
What does "the closest possible set of ..." mean? "Close" how? "the"? is there only one?
Apr
15
answered Definition of Direct Sum of Ideals
Apr
15
comment Prove $M$ is a Maximal Ideal in $\Bbb Z\times \Bbb Z$
@DavidJhoo Right!
Apr
15
revised Prove $M$ is a Maximal Ideal in $\Bbb Z\times \Bbb Z$
tex
Apr
15
answered Prove $M$ is a Maximal Ideal in $\Bbb Z\times \Bbb Z$
Apr
15
revised Characteristic of Integral-domain where $15a=0$ but $3b\neq 0$.
text markup, better title
Apr
15
answered Epimorphism affect on Ideals
Apr
15
answered valuation ring is a field?
Apr
15
comment Show that a particular set is a poset
I went ahead and made the title lowercase, and I also added tags beyond "homework". Homework tag is not supposed to be used alone.
Apr
15
revised Show that a particular set is a poset
edited tags
Apr
14
comment What is the reason for stating Cayley's theorem this way?
@anaconda if you view this as a structure theorem, then yeah, it is tempting to say the theorem is sharpened by using G and not X. But actually it isn't much of a structure theorem, it's more of a representation theorem.
Apr
14
revised What is the reason for stating Cayley's theorem this way?
added 12 characters in body
Apr
14
revised What is the reason for stating Cayley's theorem this way?
added 12 characters in body
Apr
14
comment What is the reason for stating Cayley's theorem this way?
@Seth Using the first statement, one can show that the class of such representations is exactly the class of functors of the category G into the category of sets. It's nice to know both versions, though, really.
Apr
14
answered What is the reason for stating Cayley's theorem this way?
Apr
14
comment Every radical is prime?
It is true that every radical is semiprime, that is, an intersection of prime ideals.