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Feb
1
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
15
comment Completion of rational numbers via Cauchy sequences
What do you mean "maybe"? Is this property somehow equivalent to transitivity as I stated above?
Oct
15
comment Completion of rational numbers via Cauchy sequences
Why is Definition 1 property 1 called transitivity? Doesn't transitivity mean that $\forall x,y,z \in K : (x \leq y \land y \leq z) \implies x \leq z$?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
25
awarded  Informed
Aug
19
awarded  Tumbleweed
Feb
4
comment Russell's Paradox in *Naive Set Theory* by Paul Halmos
@GME: that helps me understand somewhat. However, I still can't see how we know that we can't assume $B \notin A$ and then contrive some other contradiction. Help?
Jan
26
revised Russell's Paradox in *Naive Set Theory* by Paul Halmos
deleted 36 characters in body
Jan
26
asked Russell's Paradox in *Naive Set Theory* by Paul Halmos
Jan
9
revised Can we always construct an element not on a list?
added 97 characters in body
Jan
9
asked Can we always construct an element not on a list?
Jan
7
comment The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
I have no trouble applying this principle to objects which are somehow explicitly constructed. However, in this case, $a$, $b$, and $ab$ do not seem to me to be explicitly constructed and so I have trouble applying the principle.
Jan
7
comment The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
So you are referring to the ambiguity between a function and the category theoretic notion of a morphism? I haven't studied category theory yet, but maybe it would help me with this problem?
Jan
3
comment The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
I was referring to the binary operation of $G$. I'm not sure what you are referring to.
Jan
2
comment The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
What is ambiguous about the term "map"?
Jan
2
comment The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
@user44197 Typo fixed.
Jan
2
revised The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
edited body
Jan
2
asked The language of abstract algebra in $ab=a, ab=b$ implies $a=b$
Nov
20
comment The Magic Hat Puzzle …Vinnie's number is always one above or below Tommy's…
I have selected this as the answer despite reading the solution. I'm trusting it's correct.
Nov
20
accepted The Magic Hat Puzzle …Vinnie's number is always one above or below Tommy's…