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Jul
11
comment Under the Gregorian calendar, what days can never be Easter?
This calculation will work most of the time. In some religions, observers watch for the full moon and then name the date. Their full moon can be different from the astronomical full moon. (human error?)
Jul
11
accepted Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
...which I guess this is, but it's a bit contrived.
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
I was looking to show the outer sum is always absolute.$$ \sum_{n=1}^\infty \bigg( | \sum_{d\mid\#_n} \mu(d) | \bigg)$$
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
@GregMartin, should I have placed parentheses as you have?
Jul
11
comment Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
@GregMartin, can you make that an answer so I can accept it?
Jul
11
asked Are these partial sums and partial products absolutely convergent?
Jul
10
accepted Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
Jul
10
revised Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
added alternate statement
Jul
10
comment Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
@MichaelHardy, possibly partial products?
Jul
10
comment Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
@MichaelHardy, I got the second line from OEIS,
Jul
10
comment Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
@MichaelHardy, second is good. The first is more complicated. We take the divisors of the product of the first $n$ primes. The we sum those divisors while applying the sign using $\mu$.
Jul
10
asked Is the relationship between these two sequences, identical but for signs, trivial?
Jun
3
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
hid some complexity
Jun
2
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
Fixed syntax, inserted wedges
Jun
2
comment Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
@Ken, I posted my approach, a little late because my inter-net was out. Let's find out if I paid attention.
Jun
2
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
added major revisions per comments
May
31
comment Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
@Ken, Would it be better to abandon the current format and use individual sets? Like use $\alpha(\cdot)$ to create the set of first $x$'s, etc.?
May
31
comment Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
@Ken, I was avoiding Union because is doesn't emphasize the fact that there are no duplicates, but I will replace the Join. What can I do about the embedded updating of $x$? The $x$ is initialized within $\beta$, used as the first vertex, set again to be used as the second vertex, etc. I will rework this and show in OP as an edit line. Thanks.
May
31
revised Can you help with Syracuse (3x+1)/2 disjoint tree graph set-builder notation?
improved notation by explaining the directed edge