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age 27
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I'm currently a graduate student at University of Washington. I'm interested in combinatorics.


Apr
12
answered Proof strategy - If $g \circ f = id_A$, then f onto $\iff$ g 1-1. [Chartrand 3Ed P239 9.72]
Apr
11
comment What job did you get with a degree in math?
Probability is a subset of real analysis. Also, field theory is useful in cryptography and so is very widely used in industry.
Apr
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
29
answered Scholarly work on the beauty of math
Mar
18
comment Why does an odd number plus one, not necessarily entail it being even?
$\sqrt{5}$ is not considered an odd number. Odd numbers are integers. Thus $\sqrt{5}$ is neither odd nor even.
Mar
16
comment Very interesting graph!
+1: I will upvote anyone who says an equation is very, very cool. :)
Mar
14
comment What is this method of dividing a plane called?
Here's a sketch of a proof that it's infinite. Let $C_n$ be the convex hull of all of the points in the $n$th step. Then intersecting any two nonparallel, non-adjacent edge-lines of the polygon $C_n$ will give a point outside $C_n$, by convexity. So $C_n \subsetneq C_{n+1}$.
Mar
14
comment What is this method of dividing a plane called?
I haven't heard of it before, but maybe someone else knows.
Mar
14
comment What is this method of dividing a plane called?
Just playing around with the pictures you get, I think you get infinitely many points, and you can get points arbitrarily close together. You might even get a set dense in the plane.
Mar
14
comment What is this method of dividing a plane called?
So you'll probably get three new points in Step 3, corresponding to intersecting the diagonal lines and the two pairs of lines going through the opposite sides.
Mar
14
comment What is this method of dividing a plane called?
Do you also intersect the diagonals $\overleftrightarrow{P_1P_3}$ and $\overleftrightarrow{P_2 P_4}$?
Mar
12
comment Generating Functions Interpretation - Expanding around other points?
Also, if $f(x)$ is just a polynomial then there are times when it's useful to look at $f(x+1)$, etc. In that case there are no problems with convergence.
Mar
12
comment Generating Functions Interpretation - Expanding around other points?
Yes, expanding a function $f(x)$ in a Taylor series around $x=a$ is equivalent to expanding $f(x+a)$ around $x=0$, so you really only need to talk about power series expanded around $0$. You could still ask if it's meaningful to compare the coefficients you get expanding around different points. I would not go so far as to declare that it's useless, but there are tricky convergence issues to deal with and in the context of generating functions we usually try to avoid this.
Mar
10
comment Generating Functions Interpretation - Expanding around other points?
Yup, $e$ does seem to turn up! But that's why I said it doesn't have any direct combinatorial significance. :)
Mar
9
revised Generating Functions Interpretation - Expanding around other points?
added 525 characters in body
Mar
9
answered Generating Functions Interpretation - Expanding around other points?
Mar
5
revised Why a false statement can imply anything?
deleted 960 characters in body
Mar
5
answered Why a false statement can imply anything?
Mar
3
awarded  Promoter
Feb
28
asked References for chromatic symmetric functions of hypergraphs