Reputation
Top tag
Next privilege 50 Rep.
Comment everywhere
Badges
2 16
Newest
 Enthusiast
Impact
~9k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 12 votes cast
Mar
12
revised Seeking proof for the formula relating Pi with its convergents
deleted 1 character in body
Feb
29
comment Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
@Aboozar - My thinking is that if this generalized explicit formula gives correct values (except for n=5; but the same exception also applies for simpler formulas in lines 1, 3 and 6) it may (or may not) have some underlying reason (unknown to me). Yes, it doesn't look pretty and I wish it would look more compact. I wonder whether or not Occam's razor concept is applicable to mathematics?
Feb
29
revised Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
added 87 characters in body
Feb
29
comment Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
@Aboozar wolframalpha.com/input/…
Feb
29
comment Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
@Aboozar wolframalpha.com/input/?i=Table+prime(mod(4,n)!!)+for+n%3D1...9
Feb
29
comment Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
@Aboozar - eulerphi(prime(mod(4,n)!!)
Feb
28
revised Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
edited tags
Feb
28
revised Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
edited tags
Feb
21
revised Seeking proof for the formula relating Pi with its convergents
edited tags
Feb
21
revised Seeking proof for the formula relating Pi with its convergents
edited tags
Feb
21
awarded  Enthusiast
Feb
17
comment A series of positive terms to prove $\pi>\frac{333}{106}$
@FDP - re integrals ... See math.stackexchange.com/questions/860499/…
Feb
15
comment A series to prove $\frac{22}{7}-\pi>0$
So based on several series versions already found for 22/7 - Pi, it appears that similar to infinite number of integral expressions (as it was shown by Thomas Baruchel), there are infinite number of series as well.
Feb
14
comment What number comes next in the sequence $7, 16, 8, 27, 9,…$?
Too bad multiple choice did not include 38 a(n) = 1/4*((10*n - 3)*(-1)^n + 12*n + 23) for n>=1 7, 16, 8, 27, 9, 38, 10, 49, 11, 60, 12, 71, 13, 82, 14, 93, 15, 104, 16, ...
Feb
14
comment Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
@DietrichBurde - I'm learning formatting in strides - what you could barely read in my question constitutes a huge math formatting progress for me:-) If you would care to improve my bad formatting here - it will help my learning process.
Feb
14
comment Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
I moved my question from mathoverflow to here, since it was not considered to be worthy of attention and appreciation there.
Feb
14
asked Is there any significance in such Heegner numbers (or class number 1) representation symmetry?
Feb
14
comment Series and integrals for inequalities and approximations to $\pi$
Speaking of symmetry in your nice series, factors in the numerators - they are definitely internally symmetrically balanced; for 22/7 one: 3+17=5+15=7+13=9+11=20 for 333/106 one: 9+23=11+21=13+19=15+17=32
Feb
14
comment Is there a formula to approximate $\pi$ in the form of $\dfrac{p}{q}$?
As a follow up to previous comment, in the summation case the denominator is 8-th degree polynomial and the numerator is 2-nd degree polynomial (both with regards to "k"), while in the integration case the denominator is 2-nd degree polynomial and the numerator is 8-th degree polynomial (both with regards to "x").
Feb
14
comment Is there a formula to approximate $\pi$ in the form of $\dfrac{p}{q}$?
It is interesting to compare above summation with integration per $$\pi = \frac{22}{7} - \int_{0}^{1}\frac{x^4(1-x)^4}{1+x^2}\,\mathrm{d}x$$