3,260 reputation
2830
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location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 21
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 3 hours ago

(my about me is currently blank)


Jul
14
comment Problems regarding exponents
@Rick: Yeah, I think I'll change it. Thanks for the advice!
Jul
14
answered Problems regarding exponents
Jul
7
comment I have to show $(1+\frac1n)^n$ is monotonically increasing sequence
Unless I'm missing something, that sequence is increasing, not decreasing.
Jul
1
accepted Does this weird sequence have a limit?
Jun
30
comment Does this weird sequence have a limit?
That's interesting. Does this change if instead of picking a number from ${1,2,3,4,5,6}$ we choose a random real number, or maybe one from the interval $[0,1]$?
Jun
30
comment Does this weird sequence have a limit?
@anon: Making a needlessly complicated definition was sort of the point. Also, you don't necessarily have to choose $k$ randomly. You can start from $1$ and work your way up if you want; the point is not so much in what order the terms are calculated, but that you can calculate $a_k$ for any $k$ you want.
Jun
30
comment Does this weird sequence have a limit?
@AndréNicolas: What I mean if that $a_k$ has already been calculated, there is no need to roll the die again. We just look at the list and check what was the value of $a_k$.
Jun
30
asked Does this weird sequence have a limit?
Jun
24
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
23
revised Expanding out summation signs
transformed image into latex, hope I read it right
Jun
23
suggested suggested edit on Expanding out summation signs
Jun
23
comment If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
Also, a nitpick: shouldn't it be $x > 0$ instead of $x \ge 0$?
Jun
23
comment If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
This is the answer I like more, simply because you provided a function for which it is easy to check that it's a counterexample (just differentiate and take limits). Thanks!
Jun
23
accepted If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
Jun
23
asked If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Jun
4
accepted How do we know that $\exp(x)$ agrees with raising a number to a rational power?
Jun
4
comment How do we know that $\exp(x)$ agrees with raising a number to a rational power?
Yeah, sorry about that, fixed it. I think I liked Jim Belk's answer a little more, but thanks for your help!
Jun
4
revised How do we know that $\exp(x)$ agrees with raising a number to a rational power?
deleted 168 characters in body