3,233 reputation
2830
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location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 21
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 2 hours ago

(my about me is currently blank)


Jul
14
revised Problems regarding exponents
Not smart to use the same letters as in the assignments
Jul
14
comment Problems regarding exponents
@Rick: Yeah, I think I'll change it. Thanks for the advice!
Jul
14
answered Problems regarding exponents
Jul
7
comment I have to show $(1+\frac1n)^n$ is monotonically increasing sequence
Unless I'm missing something, that sequence is increasing, not decreasing.
Jul
1
accepted Does this weird sequence have a limit?
Jun
30
comment Does this weird sequence have a limit?
That's interesting. Does this change if instead of picking a number from ${1,2,3,4,5,6}$ we choose a random real number, or maybe one from the interval $[0,1]$?
Jun
30
comment Does this weird sequence have a limit?
@anon: Making a needlessly complicated definition was sort of the point. Also, you don't necessarily have to choose $k$ randomly. You can start from $1$ and work your way up if you want; the point is not so much in what order the terms are calculated, but that you can calculate $a_k$ for any $k$ you want.
Jun
30
comment Does this weird sequence have a limit?
@AndréNicolas: What I mean if that $a_k$ has already been calculated, there is no need to roll the die again. We just look at the list and check what was the value of $a_k$.
Jun
30
asked Does this weird sequence have a limit?
Jun
24
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
23
revised Expanding out summation signs
transformed image into latex, hope I read it right
Jun
23
suggested suggested edit on Expanding out summation signs
Jun
23
comment If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
Also, a nitpick: shouldn't it be $x > 0$ instead of $x \ge 0$?
Jun
23
comment If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
This is the answer I like more, simply because you provided a function for which it is easy to check that it's a counterexample (just differentiate and take limits). Thanks!
Jun
23
accepted If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
Jun
23
asked If a function has a finite limit at infinity, does that imply its derivative goes to zero?
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Jun
4
accepted How do we know that $\exp(x)$ agrees with raising a number to a rational power?
Jun
4
comment How do we know that $\exp(x)$ agrees with raising a number to a rational power?
Yeah, sorry about that, fixed it. I think I liked Jim Belk's answer a little more, but thanks for your help!