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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jan 26 at 1:37

sometimes I am slow accepting answers, but I will eventually


4h
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
26
asked Why is this line integral not $0$? (An incorrect application?)
Jan
22
comment Why is every sequential map uniformly continuous
I know any $\delta < 1$ works. I thought we have to know something about $f$ before we can select $\delta$.
Jan
22
comment Why is every sequential map uniformly continuous
Why is $\delta = 1/2$?
Jan
22
comment Why is every sequential map uniformly continuous
@Hoot, I didn't write down anything rigorous like that. That idea just occurred to me after drawing some pictures. Because since I will have discrete points on the plane, I can't get discontinuity.
Jan
22
asked Why is every sequential map uniformly continuous
Jan
21
comment prove $S = \{x \mid x \in \mathbb R , x^2 < 2\}$ has a least upper bound
Why can't we just check the criterions for LUB? (bounded, nonempty, and subset of $\Bbb R$)
Jan
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
15
comment Cauchy Goursat, why triangles?
@abel, so its "kind of" like a homotopy?
Jan
15
comment Cauchy Goursat, why triangles?
@abel, that's only true for polygons right? What happens if we have a circle or any convex path that has curvature?
Jan
15
revised Cauchy Goursat, why triangles?
added 1 character in body; edited title
Jan
15
comment Cauchy Goursat, why triangles?
@abel, it is Goursat.
Jan
15
asked Cauchy Goursat, why triangles?
Jan
11
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
2
comment $E$ measurable set and $m(E\cap I)\le \frac{1}{2}m(I)$ for any open interval, prove $m(E) =0$
thanks. From this technique, is it also okay to replace them with clopen sets $(n, n + 1]$? It looks like it is.
Jan
2
comment $E$ measurable set and $m(E\cap I)\le \frac{1}{2}m(I)$ for any open interval, prove $m(E) =0$
Can I ask why is it enough to prove for $[n, n + 1]$ and not $(n, n + 1)$? I know there is very little difference.
Dec
24
comment The $n$-fold wedge product of a $2$ form
I left out $dx_2 \wedge dx_3$ probably because I thought my answer still wouldn't have made a difference (it's the same). I basically couldn't tell the difference between $1$ and $2$ and it puzzled me for a few days...
Dec
24
asked The $n$-fold wedge product of a $2$ form
Dec
13
comment Application of Weierstrass' theorem
Why are you allowed to set $p(x) := f(0) + \int_{0}^{x}q(y) dy$? That's what I am mainly confused with.
Dec
13
comment Given that A is an nxn symmetric matrix, show that $(Av)\cdot w=v\cdot (Aw) $
You are missing the transpose?