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Dec
19
answered Is a factorial-primorial mesh ever divisible by the primorial?
Dec
19
answered Conway's Soldiers
Dec
18
comment Is a factorial-primorial mesh ever divisible by the primorial?
Isn't it an integer for $n=3$? The numerator is $120$ and the denominator is $30$.
Dec
12
comment Is this a sufficient proof of a math contest problem?
For one thing, your argument doesn't address $a=0$, and arguably not $b=0$, either.
Dec
9
comment Integration/Fundamental Calculus/Transcendental Numbers
There are functions whose antiderivatives can't be written in terms of elementary functions. Incidentally, your arc length formula is wrong.
Dec
7
comment Cardinality of the Mandelbrot set
The more interesting fact is that the boundary of the Mandelbrot set has Hausdorff dimension 2.
Dec
6
answered Pinpointing a hidden submarine moving at constant speed
Dec
6
comment How big can a set be?
I'm not certain, but I think what Henning Makholm might be looking for is "the axiom of limitation of size"
Dec
4
comment Winning Strategy with Addition to X=0
Incidentally, this is equivalent to the subtraction game with subtraction set $\{1,2,...,10\}$ and heap size $100$. Subtraction games always have a periodic Nim/Grundy value sequence, and hence a periodic winning/losing position pattern. Subtraction games with their subtraction sets having the form $\{1,2,...,k\}$ are discussed on Wikipedia.
Nov
30
answered $f(x)=\sum_{t}{x \choose t}{n-x \choose k-t}$ - even or odd?
Nov
28
comment Cardioid in coffee mug?
physics.stackexchange.com/a/91164/31276 is related, and may be helpful. I'm not certain this is the issue, but note that the slope you want is the negative reciprocal of the slope you got. This suggests perpendicularity, which appears involved as en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caustic_%28mathematics%29 mentions the "orthotomic".
Nov
28
answered Some explanation regarding a diagram of homotopy
Nov
28
answered How do you draw/visualize a combination table?
Nov
27
accepted Name/significance of integral of the square of a probability density function
Nov
27
comment Solving a Recurrence for a Mathematical Game
@shardulc Briefly: S-G says every position in a game like this is essentially a single heap of Nim in disguise. A heap of size 0 is a losing position since there is no move available. A heap of any bigger size is a winning position since a good move is "take the whole heap". I don't think the Wiki page for S-G is so great; if you want to learn more, you can read these MIT class notes, or some blog posts I made, or google around.
Nov
26
answered on a game playable with tokens
Nov
26
answered Solving a Recurrence for a Mathematical Game
Nov
22
comment Applications of Combinatorial Game Theory
You might be interested in "The Rat game and the Mouse game" by Fraenkel which appears to be related to connections between combinatorial game theory to combinatorial number theory.
Nov
22
answered Game theory: power and mod
Nov
22
comment Can anyone explain this more clearly?
Groups are studied in abstract algebra, in the subfield of "group theory". Whatever it is you're reading is assuming you've already taken a course in abstract algebra (or at least worked through a significant portion of a textbook on it), so that you're at a point where you already know something called "the fundamental theorem of finitely generated abelian groups" (note that it's a theorem, not a theory). I would recommend either getting another source for CGT if you don't want to wait until you know group theory