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Oct
13
comment countable subset of surreal games
To address your last question first, division doesn't generally work out for non-surreal games, and to the extent that it does, it's not unique: Should * be considered 0/2 since *+*=0? You are likely doomed if you're looking to go beyond the surreals. -- The nice way to use division over some surreals with finite representations is to use the standard notation for rational numbers and ordinals, etc. $1/\omega+1/(1+1/\omega_1)$ is a finite string representing a surreal number that's not a rational. $1/3$ is a finite representationing a surreal number with infinite sign expansion. etc.
Sep
30
comment What does a complex root signify?
This is just a random example, but the complex roots of $x^2+1=0$ are in some sense the reason the radius of convergence for the series expansion at $x=0$ of $1/(x^2+1)$ is $1$.
Sep
26
comment countable subset of surreal games
What do you mean by the phrases "those which are countable", "computable game", or "the countable subset of all games in a finite number of steps"? If you have to output countably many things, and outputting one thing is a step, you're not going to be able to do it in finitely many steps. You could take the computable sign expansions (analogous to computable binary expansions of reals), but even if that's what you want, I'm not sure what question you're asking about them.
Sep
24
comment Is there a more general concept than position and space?
"Draw 3 maps, one for each object" strongly brings to mind the concept of a "manifold", where local maps (called "charts" so you don't confuse it with the "function" meaning of the word "map") combine together to give information about the whole space.
Sep
23
comment CGT: value of sum game is sum of values of games
@HennoBrandsma I respectfully disagree. Addition of games yields a game in which players can move in either component. A priori, there's no reason to think that the naming convention for, say, the games which are "numbers" would work out so that all standard addition facts are preserved.
Sep
23
answered CGT: value of sum game is sum of values of games
Sep
17
comment Which is greater, $20 \uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow 20$ or $4 \uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow 4$?
I realized later that since $2^{10}$ is about $10^3$ (and less than $10^4$ for sure), you can get ballpark estimates/bounds on $20^{20}$ and $4^{256}$ without a calculator. $20^{20}$ is about $10^{26}$ and less than $10^{28}$, but $4^{256}$ is over $10^{153}\gg10^{28} $.
Sep
7
comment Construction of an infinite number type and other ideas
@11dim I still don't know if you're asking a question, or commenting on my answer, or just trying to advertise your ideas in the comments to an answer, which is probably not the best place for them.
Aug
20
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
18
revised Which is greater, $20 \uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow 20$ or $4 \uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow 4$?
fixed 2.5 exponents
Aug
16
answered Which is greater, $20 \uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow 20$ or $4 \uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow\uparrow 4$?
Jul
19
comment Integration problem $\displaystyle \int \frac{dx}{x(x^3+8)}$
Can you find a zero of $x^3+8$? That can help you factor the denominator.
Jul
19
comment On which occasions will the intelligent layperson fail to recognize a mathematics problem?
There are problems with which mathematics can help, like "dividing up rent among a group of people", but given a precise phrasing of the corresponding mathematical problem, I think it would sound much more like mathematics. Would things like that count?
Jul
19
revised A question about limit 22
fixed due to differentiability condition
Jul
19
comment A question about limit 22
@BarryCipra Whoops! Well that's boring. Thanks; I'll edit.
Jul
19
answered A question about limit 22
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
26
answered What is the opposite of a robust system?
May
26
comment How exactly is $i=\sqrt{-1}$ related to $\mathbb{C}$ being a closed algebraic field?
It's important to note (and the links clarify this) that the Quaternions are not what you get when you have the same goal (algebraic closure) but happen to be working with matrices, but rather something reminiscent of the complex numbers you can get when you change/weaken the goal.