2,877 reputation
627
bio website combinatorialgames.wordpress.…
location United States
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Jul 7 at 13:33

I have an amateur interest in combinatorial game theory and rarely update a blog with some basic exposition on the subject (see website).

If you need to contact me, use the e-mail address at this link.


Feb
24
answered My problem in understanding the minimal counterexample technique
Feb
24
answered Can someone help me understand Cramer's Rule?
Feb
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Can someone help me understand Cramer's Rule?
Feb
24
comment Any interesting properties of Fermat's Last Theorem Surfaces?
Given the mathematics involved in the proof of Fermat's last theorem, I thought from the title that the question might have been about elliptic curves or something.
Feb
24
answered Shorthand method for expressing the limit of something
Feb
24
comment Why do you need to use the chain rule in differentiation of ln?
@Goos Thanks, I'm still not used to just how much MathJaX actually supports in posts.
Feb
24
answered Primes created by “n + digital-root(n)” sequences
Feb
23
comment Primes created by “n + digital-root(n)” sequences
@gammatester The pattern is that each starting point for a record number of steps is itself prime.
Feb
23
answered Why do you need to use the chain rule in differentiation of ln?
Feb
23
answered Graph nomenclature
Feb
23
answered Gradient of a function involving integrals
Feb
22
revised Multiply trig functions of the same base?
made square more visible
Feb
22
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Multiply trig functions of the same base?
Feb
22
revised Multiply trig functions of the same base?
variable of trigonometry sinx
Feb
22
comment Name/significance of integral of the square of a probability density function
@Did Thank you for your comment. $E(f(X))$ is somewhat satisfying as it is an interpretation that is easy to explain/sounds meaningful in the discrete case, but still applies in the continuous case. Do you want to turn your comment into an answer?
Feb
22
comment Spivak's Axioms of a Number system.
@Berci It was just an example. Neither time nor antimatter is required for the concept of negative numbers, even if you restrict things to real-life implementations. For example, you could handle positive and negative integers with groups of coins, where you may remove any "heads&tails" pair of coins in the same group. But many would say that mathematics isn't necessarily based on any physical setup (in this sense) anyway.
Feb
22
answered Spivak's Axioms of a Number system.
Feb
22
answered Checking differentiability at the origin
Feb
19
comment Decide whether a function has an elementary indefinite integral without determining it!
This may just be a matter of taste, and I know this is how it's written on wikipedia, but I find "an indefinite integral" to be an awkward phrasing. I think of "indefinite integral" as something like "set of all antiderivatives (written in odd ways and sometimes inaccurately)". If you just want one function without a +C or whatever, I figure you want "an (elementary) antiderivative".
Feb
16
comment The equation of parabolas.
As an aside, Desmos seems to handle this more smoothly and it's slightly easier for the user to create their own version for other families of equations.