5,042 reputation
1932
bio website mpi-sws.org
location Kaiserslautern, Germany
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 10 hours ago

PhD student at MPI-SWS.


Jan
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Binomial Theorem Practical Problem
Jan
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Continuous mapping between topological spaces
Dec
30
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Order of elements in abelian groups
Dec
7
comment Why $\langle I, J\rangle =R$ for distinct prime ideals $I$, $J$ of a principal ideal domain $R$?
You need the extra side condition $I,J \neq 0$!
Dec
6
reviewed Reviewed find the extremal of a function
Dec
6
comment find the extremal of a function
I'm sorry, but I find this answer completely incomprehensible.
Dec
6
reviewed Looks OK Show that if a, b and c are integers with c|ab then c|(a,c)(b,c)
Dec
6
reviewed Reviewed How to find the matrix A
Dec
6
revised How to find the matrix A
TeXified, fixed minor grammar error.
Dec
6
reviewed No Action Needed Show that if $a$ and $b$ are positive integers then there are divisors $c$ of $a$ and $d$ of $b$ with $(c, d) = 1$ and $cd = [a, b]$
Dec
6
reviewed Close Find the value of $\cos(2\pi /5)$ using radicals
Nov
28
awarded  Fanatic
Nov
27
comment Show that the field $L = \mathbb F_3[X]/\langle X^5 - X + 1\rangle$ consists of $243$ elements and that $[X][f] = [1]$ for some $[f] \in L$.
Some hints: First of all, it helps to consider $L$ as an $\mathbb F_3$-vectorspace, and note that $243 = 3^5$. Now, if $K$ is a finite field with $k$ elements, an $n$-dimemsional $K$-vectorspace has $k^n$ elements... To show that $L$ is a field, you should be able to use the following well-known theorem: Let $R$ be a ring and $I$ a maximal ideal. Then $R/I$ is a field.
Nov
26
reviewed Close Show that $M$ is a right $R^{0}$-module
Nov
25
reviewed Leave Open Minimal difference between classical and intuitionistic sequent calculus
Nov
25
reviewed Leave Open Famous black mathematicians
Nov
25
reviewed Close Calculus Related Rates Question
Nov
25
reviewed Leave Open interpret a sum geometrically
Nov
25
comment interpret a sum geometrically
That question doesn't address the geometric interpretation, though...
Nov
25
reviewed Close Let $x,y$ in a group G with odd order. Let $x^2=y^2$. Show that $x=y$.