Reputation
6,883
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
7 28 91
Impact
~157k people reached

Jul
13
comment Statistics books with motivation and historical tidbits about the development of the concepts?
@MichaelHardy Yes. And I'm looking exactly to the mathematical motivation for them. I'm curious to know exactly what made them develop the concept (be it "mathematical" or not). I marked "mathematical" because sometimes in the development of mathematics, things were not really mathematically justified, such as Leibniz infinitesimals.
Jul
13
asked Statistics books with motivation and historical tidbits about the development of the concepts?
Jul
12
asked Is Risch algorithm learnable by a human being?
Jul
7
accepted When should I shift $a$ and $b$ in $\cfrac{x^2}{a^2}+\cfrac{y^2}{b^2}=1$?
Jul
7
accepted Where are these choices of $A',B',C'$ for this quadratic form?
Jul
6
comment Is it a good practice to write this integral in this form?
@JohnMa I'm supposing I don't know it for a while. But I'll compute it a little later. Do you think this presents a big problem?
Jul
6
revised Is it a good practice to write this integral in this form?
added 22 characters in body
Jul
6
asked Is it a good practice to write this integral in this form?
Jul
3
comment Reference Request: Regge Symmetry “Angle-Edge” Duality
I believe Bob Marley is a feasible reference to what you're looking for.
Jul
3
revised How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
added 11 characters in body
Jul
3
comment How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
One silly doubt: In the book I'm reading, it says about eliminating the linear terms, in another place I've read, it seems that the objective is to eliminate the term with $xy$. Are they equivalent? There is also another book I have that says that the objective seems to be to write the conic in the form $ax^2+bxy+cy^2$. I'm a little confused.
Jul
3
revised How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
added 292 characters in body
Jul
3
comment How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
I need to do a change of variable such that $xy=0$, right?
Jul
3
comment How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
@r9m What's the difference of them? I know that this matrix form is associated (can be expanded) to a quadratic form. But I'm not sure what your matrix does.
Jul
3
comment How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
@r9m There are two matrixes. This one you mentioned and: $$\begin{pmatrix} {x}&{y}&{1} \end{pmatrix}\begin{pmatrix} {a}&{b/2}&{d/2}\\ {b/2}&{c}&{e/2}\\ {d/2}&{e/2}&{f} \end{pmatrix}\begin{pmatrix} {x}\\ {y}\\ {z} \end{pmatrix}$$
Jul
3
asked How to get rid of the term with $xy$?
Jul
3
revised Should the expanded expression of a quadratic form be equals to It's original expression?
added 171 characters in body
Jul
3
comment Should the expanded expression of a quadratic form be equals to It's original expression?
@RoryDaulton That is also viable. But In my mind, they didn't seem valid for operations in equations. But I jsut checked Apostol's book and saw that they are indeed appropriate. Thanks for pointing it out.
Jul
3
revised Should the expanded expression of a quadratic form be equals to It's original expression?
deleted 3 characters in body
Jul
3
asked Should the expanded expression of a quadratic form be equals to It's original expression?