Reputation
6,340
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
6 27 86
Impact
~142k people reached

9h
accepted The angle between $u$ and $v$ is $30º$, and the vector $w$ of norm $4$ is ortogonal to both $u,v$. Calculate $[u,v,w]$.
9h
asked The angle between $u$ and $v$ is $30º$, and the vector $w$ of norm $4$ is ortogonal to both $u,v$. Calculate $[u,v,w]$.
10h
revised Suplement books for calculus course?
added 124 characters in body
May
19
comment Why having $ma+np=1$ implies that $m$ is the inverse?
Yes. Every multiple of $mp$ of $p$ puts $mp$ in the same class of equivalence, namely $mp=\overline{0}$, then $ma+\overline{0}=1$. I guess I get it now.
May
19
comment Why having $ma+np=1$ implies that $m$ is the inverse?
What do you mean with $[]$?
May
19
asked Why having $ma+np=1$ implies that $m$ is the inverse?
May
17
reviewed Approve Clarification on Implicit Derivatives steps
May
17
comment A silly problem on critical points?
@zhw. So those critical points are complex critical points?
May
17
revised A silly problem on critical points?
added 330 characters in body
May
17
comment A silly problem on critical points?
@zhw. Then why Wolfram Alpha says there are critical points?
May
17
comment A silly problem on critical points?
@John Yes. But the problem is that it seems that it's possible to do some magic and use it. Mathematica solves $\sin(x)=2$ as {{x -> ConditionalExpression[\[Pi] - ArcSin[2] + 2 \[Pi] C[1], C[1] \[Element] Integers]}, {x -> ConditionalExpression[ArcSin[2] + 2 \[Pi] C[1], C[1] \[Element] Integers]}}.
May
17
comment A silly problem on critical points?
@John From the page: "$Sin^{-1}(x)$ is the inverse sine function."
May
17
comment A silly problem on critical points?
@John See here.
May
17
asked A silly problem on critical points?
May
17
revised Barbeau's Polynomials: Quadratic Polynomials, 1.2.2
edited tags
May
17
asked Barbeau's Polynomials: Quadratic Polynomials, 1.2.2
May
17
accepted Having the roots of a polynomial, is it possible to go back and find a polynomial that have exactly these roots?
May
17
revised Having the roots of a polynomial, is it possible to go back and find a polynomial that have exactly these roots?
edited tags
May
17
asked Having the roots of a polynomial, is it possible to go back and find a polynomial that have exactly these roots?
May
14
comment If $n^2=ab$ and $\gcd(a,b)=1$, show that $a,b$ are not necessarily squares.
And the author actually gave a similar hint in the beginning of the questions and I completely missed it. I'm so stupid.