Reputation
1,098
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
1 6 10
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~87k people reached

May
1
comment What is cosine to the power of zero?
@AlexR: I'd really like to see a reference to a book where they leave $0^0$ undefined. The reason for my comment was the following: I've been teaching calculus for years, and many students had learned in school that $0^0$ is undefined. Then suddenly we have power series and stuff like that where $0^0$ appears naturally, and one needs to know that it's equal to $1$. So call it my mission to bring the gospel $0^0=1$ to the world.
May
1
comment What is cosine to the power of zero?
@AlexR: In analysis, one always defines $0^0=1$, but you're right that one has to keep in mind that $(x,y)\mapsto x^y$ is not continuous at $(0,0)$. In set theory, $0^0=1$ since $0^0=\varnothing^\varnothing=\{\varnothing\}$. I'm not 100% sure about other areas of mathematics. Where does it remain undefined, usually?
May
1
comment What is cosine to the power of zero?
I don't understand why you write "undefined else": $0^0$ is defined as $1$. And that's important, how would you write power series without this definition? (As in $\exp(x) = \sum_{n=0}^\infty x^n/n!$)
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
19
comment Series that converge to $\pi$ quickly
@Ekuurh: You're right, the formulation "can be used" might be a bit misleading. The formula can be used for what I claim, but with increasing $n$ the computing time increases like $n\ln n$.
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
May
28
comment Surprisingly elementary and direct proofs
Can you please explain a bit about the part "the computation can be done directly without appeal to the general minimum modulus principle"? This interests me very much! (I didn't do that proof in my lecture because I didn't have the general minimum modulus principle available.)
May
26
comment How do you respond to “I was always bad at math”?
@Steve: Maybe it depends on what you mean by "hard" and "struggle". The first thing I remember for which I'd use those words is closure operators, and this was in my first year at university. But that doesn't mean that I understood everything before immediately at the first read. So I come to the same conclusion as Brian, and would only say that math is hard for most people.
May
25
comment Infinite series and its upper and lower limit.
@Brian: Ah, thanks, now I got it! I interpreted the fact as the positive outcome of the ratio test for the modified series, which induced me to post my first comment. Thanks again!
May
25
comment Infinite series and its upper and lower limit.
@Brian: Ah, I think now I get your point. The result I use is simple enough, but it has to be proved, and one has to say that one uses it. Agreed! However, I maintain that your formulation "you can’t make use of the fact to show that it converges" is not true. Or maybe I don't understand "can’t make use" well enough, I'm not a native speaker? I'd rather say something like "this fact alone doesn't yet show that it converges".
May
25
comment Infinite series and its upper and lower limit.
@Brian: OK, let me formulate it differently. The series has positive terms, so the sequence of its partial sums is increasing. And an increasing sequence is convergent if any of its subsequences is convergent. The OP proved convergence of one subsequence, so we're done.
May
25
comment Infinite series and its upper and lower limit.
@Brian: "you can’t make use of the fact to show that it converges" is not true. You should make use of that fact, and indeed you should do it properly. The series in question has positive terms, so that fact proves that the series is absolutely convergent.
May
13
comment How to represent the floor function using mathematical notation?
@Nathaniel: We're talking about the $(-\frac\pi2,\frac\pi2)$ branch (the tangent is $\pi$-periodic) :-) Of course it's only convention, but it's the standard mathematical convention to use this branch and not another one.
May
13
comment How to represent the floor function using mathematical notation?
@Clayton and agksmehx: Using this as an implementation for the floor function would be ludicrous (pardon my French). I'm pretty sure that any implementation of $\tan$ involves the floor function in some way of another.
May
13
comment How to represent the floor function using mathematical notation?
@agksmehx: Still, the factorial should be defined as a (finite) product, not via the Gamma function!
May
13
comment How to represent the floor function using mathematical notation?
@Nathaniel: Why do you say that $\arctan$ is multi-valued? Isn't it widely accepted that it's the inverse function of $\tan\colon(-\frac\pi2,\frac\pi2)\to\mathbb R$? (For me as a mathematician this is the standard definition, and I don't know any programming language that would use another definition.)
May
12
comment How to represent the floor function using mathematical notation?
@agksmehx: Zev's answer should be the accepted one - no chickening out there, just the plain professional definition. (Of course this answer is a nice idea, too.)
May
10
comment How far can one get in analysis without leaving $\mathbb{Q}$?
Yes - compactness is at the heart of analysis!
Jan
29
awarded  Revival
Jan
12
comment What's wrong with $\sum_{i=0}^{\infty}x^i = \frac{1}{1-x}$
A small TeXnical tip: if you use \lvert, then you should also use \rvert. Thus, to denote the absolute value of x, the best usage is \lvert x \rvert. Note that |x| also works (but |\sin x| has spacing issues that \lvert \sin x \rvert does not have).