8,839 reputation
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bio website people.bath.ac.uk/mdp33
location Bath, United Kingdom
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen yesterday

Postgraduate student at the University of Bath, UK, studying geometry and representation theory. Currently thinking about cluster algebras and related objects.


Sep
27
reviewed Close Example of a group in which the equation $x^2=e$ has more than two solutions
Sep
27
comment How would one define a “manifold” object in prose writing?
In layman's terms, a manifold (in the mathematical sense, but Thomas is correct that there is another) is an object which, when looked at closely, appears to be a "flat" Euclidean space (think of looking at a sphere closely and percieving a flat plane), but may have interesting global structure (i.e., the sphere isn't actually a flat plane). The dimension is a bit of a red herring - in abstract mathematics (and indeed in a huge number of applications) there isn't anything special about dimensions smaller than 4.
Sep
27
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Finding the inverse of a rational exponential function
Sep
27
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Largest number on multiplying with itself gives the same number as last digits of the product
Sep
27
revised Largest number on multiplying with itself gives the same number as last digits of the product
latex formatting, making it easier to understand
Sep
27
comment Show that Aut(Q) is isomorphic to S4
Presumably $S_4$ is the symmetric group on four elements? You might want to explain $\operatorname{Aut}(Q)$, because I can think of a few things it could mean. (Perhaps there is an "obvious" interpretation to people more familiar with quaternions, and I think I can guess from the fact it should be isomorphic to $S_4$, but it would be nice to clarify). You should also say what you have already tried, or be more specific about what you don't understand.
Sep
27
reviewed No Action Needed having trouble with recognizing the dimension
Sep
26
reviewed Close Orders of group elements
Sep
26
comment non linear transformation that satisfies $T(cx) = cT(x)$
@ChristophPegel Haha, as well as getting the answer in faster, you got this comment in while I was editing!
Sep
26
answered non linear transformation that satisfies $T(cx) = cT(x)$
Sep
26
comment What is the first proof that you've done using induction?
Interestingly, when I did this, we did it the other way round, stating the well-ordering principle axiomatically, and using it to prove that induction works.
Sep
26
comment What is the first proof that you've done using induction?
I concur with Danny, although we started from 0. ;)
Sep
26
comment Can abstract nonsense be helpful here?
I think it's even a good viewpoint to have for simpler things like linear algebra sometimes. I never really understood why the fact that $V\cong (V^*)^*$ for finite-dimensional $V$ was interesting or important when I was an undergraduate (after all, $V\cong V^*$, right?). But a little explanation of how the double dual functor is naturally isomorphic to the identity (ideally without using the words "category", "functor" or "naturally isomorphic") can be helpful - the diagram is clear enough without the general theory. I tried this on some undergrads and it seemed to make things clearer.
Sep
26
answered linear transformation's geometric meaning
Sep
26
comment How to measure “linear dependence” of more than two vectors?
The angle seems like too much work for just two vectors - if two vectors are linearly dependent, then one is a multiple of the other. If you have $n$ vectors of length $n$, then they can be put as the columns of a square matrix and the determinant is zero if and only if there is a dependency. (Of course if you have more than $n$ vectors of length $n$, they're automatically dependent).
Sep
25
reviewed Leave Open Time and work issue
Sep
25
reviewed Close Open subgroups of $\mathbb{R}$
Sep
25
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Deriving the approximation formula
Sep
25
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Category of fractions: transitivity and cancellation property
Sep
25
revised Category of fractions: transitivity and cancellation property
changed title