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May
9
awarded  Popular Question
May
8
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
24
comment Continuity Rewritten: $\forall\delta>0,\exists\varepsilon>0\dots$
@BarryCipra, my diction was off: I meant to express "subtle," not "succinct." Thank you.
Apr
24
revised Continuity Rewritten: $\forall\delta>0,\exists\varepsilon>0\dots$
Fixed Diction
Apr
24
comment Continuity Rewritten: $\forall\delta>0,\exists\varepsilon>0\dots$
An implication is indeed not always equivalent to its converse. For this particular case, however, it was not readily obvious to me.
Apr
24
accepted Continuity Rewritten: $\forall\delta>0,\exists\varepsilon>0\dots$
Apr
24
asked Continuity Rewritten: $\forall\delta>0,\exists\varepsilon>0\dots$
Apr
20
revised How can I solve this system of linear equations?
The formatting and wording was bettered.
Apr
20
suggested approved edit on How can I solve this system of linear equations?
Apr
19
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
9
revised Converge the sequence $\left(\left(1+\frac{1}{n}\right) \left(1+\frac{2}{n}\right)\cdots\left(1+\frac{n}{n}\right)\right)^{1/n}$
The question was made more concise.
Apr
9
comment Converge the sequence $\left(\left(1+\frac{1}{n}\right) \left(1+\frac{2}{n}\right)\cdots\left(1+\frac{n}{n}\right)\right)^{1/n}$
It looks like you applied the natural logarithm (and its rules) to the above expression to end up with a Riemann sum. Is this correct?
Apr
9
suggested approved edit on Converge the sequence $\left(\left(1+\frac{1}{n}\right) \left(1+\frac{2}{n}\right)\cdots\left(1+\frac{n}{n}\right)\right)^{1/n}$
Mar
22
answered What was the book that opened your mind to the beauty of mathematics?
Mar
16
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
19
comment Precise definition of limit
@Valentino: oh, man, I have that book, and it is not that straightforward. :-O
Feb
19
comment Probability and dice rolls
+1 I programmed a simulation that corroborates this.
Feb
19
comment Intervals of Convex and Concave function
You correctly found the point where the second derivative of the function changes its sign. Now, what you call each half is irrelevant, really. However, if rain falls from above, then $x>\ln1/2$ will collect water because it is concave.
Feb
19
revised How to prove a recurrence with multiple terms?
Used LaTeX
Feb
19
suggested approved edit on How to prove a recurrence with multiple terms?