568 reputation
46
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jun 5 at 10:29

Apr
9
answered Mass of ellipsoid's surface
Apr
3
comment integrate sinus and cosinus divison
Hint: $\cos^{2}x+\sin^{2}x=1$.
Apr
3
comment Multivariable calculus chain rule
So the function you are differentiating here is $\cos(\frac{x}{y})$. Can you identify how to apply the chain rule to each part of this function now?
Apr
3
answered If $\cos A + \sec A = 3$, Then find the value of $\cos^3 A + \sec^3 A$.
Apr
3
comment One-to-One Functions - A Deeper Understanding
So the the notation for $f$ simply means that a function is to be applied to a value (or values) $x_{i}$. The image relation you have written above simply means that there does not exist to pre-image values that map the the SAME image value. If you want to call those image values $y$ then go ahead, that would be fine. Alternatively you could say that there only exists unique $y_{j}$'s arising from the function applied to unique $x_{k}$'s.
Apr
3
comment What can I do to this expression to lose the summations?
Well if the equality holds, then w.l.o.g you can move the term on the right to the left and fulfill the condition that the entire sum is zero, for all $n$. Your statement at the top is then true for all $n$.
Feb
16
awarded  Yearling
Feb
4
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
20
comment The ratio of two numbers is $7$ to $5$. The sum of the numbers is $24$. What are the numbers?
This is homework people; please don't post full answers, provide hints. I know a lot of you are well educated and well read in mathematics, it doesn't bode well for anyone else needing to learn for themselves how solve problems as these.
Jan
20
comment The ratio of two numbers is $7$ to $5$. The sum of the numbers is $24$. What are the numbers?
You need to portion out $24$ into pieces in such a way that one portion has five lots and the other seven.
Jan
20
comment The ratio of two numbers is $7$ to $5$. The sum of the numbers is $24$. What are the numbers?
Hint: 24 is divisible by 12.
Jan
16
comment Help me integrate this function…
Remember that $$\cos^{2}\theta + sin^{2} \theta = 1 $$
Jan
16
answered What is Answer Of This Aptitude Question?
Jan
8
revised Integral of $\ln\left(\sum_{k=0}^N a_kx^k\right)$
Tidied up some of the cumbersome formatting.
Jan
2
answered Showing $(n+1)^n<e^nn!$ by induction
Dec
11
comment AP Calculus Derivative
If you can't log into chat then, the answer is yes, you are right with your two values.
Dec
11
comment AP Calculus Derivative
let us continue this discussion in chat
Dec
11
comment AP Calculus Derivative
My first answer above has a typo, I meant only ONE non zero value of $x$ should come out of this.
Dec
11
comment AP Calculus Derivative
You should get $x.(3x^{2})^{2}-x^{3}(3x^{2}) = 9x^{5}-3x^{4} = 0$. Then solve for $x$. One solution.
Dec
11
comment AP Calculus Derivative
Yes, so you should end up with (after solving for your numerator in $dy/dx$ that $y=3x^2$. This tells you that this relationship says something about where the minimum or maximum occurs. Plug $y=3x^2$ into your initial (implicit) relationship between $x$ and $y$ in the very first line in your jpeg. You will then have only $x$ to solve for, you should get two values.