281 reputation
313
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age 23
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Apr 27 at 20:24

I'm a Computer Science & Mathematics double major who has an avid interest in Android and Google. I also know a bit about C (Objective-C as well), but my main focus is Android, and as a result, Java.


Dec
9
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
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awarded  Notable Question
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
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awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
Sep
17
accepted Let $C$ be a set of sets defined as follows,
Sep
17
comment Let $C$ be a set of sets defined as follows,
Oh yeah, I'm really smart. So the elements of $C$ either have cardinality of 1 due to (1), 2 due to (2), or powers of 2 due to (3).
Sep
17
comment Let $C$ be a set of sets defined as follows,
Ok good, because now it makes sense. So clearly there are no infinite sets in $C$ because for $S, T\in C$ $|\{S, T\}| = |S|+|T|$ and $|S\times T|=|S|*|T|$. But it's uncountable because there are infinitely many ways to combine elements of $C$ using either (2) or (3), right? I can't think of a way in which $C$ could be countable.
Sep
17
comment Let $C$ be a set of sets defined as follows,
Oh okay that makes sense. But do we know anything other than constructions based on the empty set?
Sep
17
comment Let $C$ be a set of sets defined as follows,
Thank you, that was part a) actually. I figured that out similarly to how you've done it. What I'm struggling with is understanding how ordered pairs can come into play. If we let $S=\{(a,b),(c,d)\}$ for example, we can have $\{S,\emptyset\}$, but how do I know that's in $C$?
Sep
17
asked Let $C$ be a set of sets defined as follows,
Feb
15
awarded  Yearling
Nov
1
comment Aristotle's Axiom in Hyperbolic Geometry
@Berci Yes, that is the Angle Unboundedness Axiom in Euclidean/Neutral geometry, but I need to figure out a way to prove that statement holds in Hyperbolic geometry.
Nov
1
asked Aristotle's Axiom in Hyperbolic Geometry
Oct
22
accepted Proving a function $f$ is continuous at a point $a$
Oct
22
comment Proving a function $f$ is continuous at a point $a$
Okay, got it. Thank you very much!!