Reputation
2,795
Next privilege 3,000 Rep.
Cast close & reopen votes
Badges
10 29
Impact
~29k people reached

2h
comment Substitutions in Probability Generating Functions
@SeyyedHosseinMousavi I just think it's bad notation to sum over $i,j$ on the right side of the equation and also have them as a label on the left.
4h
comment Substitutions in Probability Generating Functions
I think $G$ shouldn't have any subscripts, so it's $G(x,y) = \sum_{i,j}$, and $G(y) = G(1,y)$.
9h
comment How to prove that in a Kähler manifold without boundary $\Omega \wedge \cdots \wedge \Omega$ is closed but not exact?
That's what I thought too. So the Kahler condition is irrelevant no? (You just need to have a volume form on a compact manifold without boundary).
9h
comment Solving $7[x]+23\{x\}=191$
I rather than getting rid of $[x]$, keep it. You have $7m + 23y = 191$, where $m$ is an integer. This means that $23y$ must also be an integer.
1d
comment Complex vector identity
@Student I think you should use the identities (18.1) and (18.2), along with the hints by KRS.
1d
comment Complex vector identity
Is $i$ an index?
1d
comment Vector equation on plane
Hint: You just need to find a normal vector for $P$.
1d
comment Complex vector identity
The identity is false. Try $(1,0,1)$.
1d
comment Bayes theorem - is it applicable in any case?
I'm used to definining $P(A|B)$ as $P(A \cap B)/P(B)$. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditional_probability#Definition
1d
answered linearly independent (Linear algebra)
1d
comment linearly independent (Linear algebra)
Linearly independent means that $a y_1 + b y_2 = 0$ if and only if $a,b=0$.
1d
reviewed Approve The intersection of dense subset and open subset
1d
revised Antiderivative of $xe^{-cx^2}$
deleted 18 characters in body
1d
comment Antiderivative of $xe^{-cx^2}$
Why is $1/2c = 2c$?
1d
comment Proof that $a\mid x, b\mid x, \gcd(a,b)=1 \implies (ab)\mid x$
Simple, and elegant. +1
1d
comment Proof that $a\mid x, b\mid x, \gcd(a,b)=1 \implies (ab)\mid x$
I think you mean $q_2$.
1d
revised I need help simplifying this set theory question
edited tags
2d
revised How to Find the pointwise limit of $(f_n)$
added 7 characters in body
2d
comment How to Find the pointwise limit of $(f_n)$
Divide the numerator and the denominator by $n$, and see what happens as $n\to\infty$.
2d
comment Multivalued Functions for Dummies
Thanks! I'll check it out.