162 reputation
4
bio website alexloney.com
location
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jan 25 at 5:25

I lead a double life.

On one hand, I am a graduate student, seeking my Masters' degree in Computer Science. My bachelors degree is a double major in Computer Science and Pure Mathematics. I enjoy all of the benefits of that, such as late-night coding sessions, regular exams, research papers, and all that fun stuff!

On the other hand, I am employed full-time as a Software Developer, reaping all of the benefits of that as well. Which includes, but is not limited to, busy days filled with meetings, design methodologies, and more coding.

All in all, I stay very busy with both of my lives, it is amazing that I even have time to visit this website.


Dec
2
accepted True or False question about continuous functions
Dec
2
comment True or False question about continuous functions
Well, my first thought would be $\infty$ (if I could set a function value to $\infty$...), but after looking closer at the function, as $x$ gets closer to 0.5 from the negative side, it approaches $-\infty$, and $\infty$ from the positive side. Wouldn't any value that I set create a discontinuity between the positive and negative sides?
Dec
2
comment True or False question about continuous functions
Nevermind, @DonAntonio answered the question I was asking! Thank you, so simply setting a random value for $f(0.5)$ is sufficient to define it there, but still not be continuous.
Dec
2
comment True or False question about continuous functions
@ChrisEagle Ok, since f is not defined at $f(0.5)$, what else could I use to find something that has an image which is not an interval, but still defined everywhere in $[0,1]$? Maybe it would have something to do with continuity, since the problem does not say "continuous function"?
Dec
2
asked True or False question about continuous functions
Nov
15
awarded  Supporter
Oct
24
awarded  Teacher
Oct
24
answered Find a number $x<100$ that satisfies three congruences.
Oct
23
accepted How to prove that an integer exists matching the criteria
Oct
23
comment How to prove that an integer exists matching the criteria
Thank you, that helps a lot. Because $a-\epsilon < a_n < a+\epsilon$ and $a-\epsilon>0$, we then know that, for all $n>N_\epsilon$ that $0<a_n$. Thus that concludes the proof, because we now know that for some $n>N$ that $a_n>0$! It took me a bit of re-reading your answer to fully get that ha! Thank you.
Oct
23
asked How to prove that an integer exists matching the criteria
Feb
12
awarded  Scholar
Feb
12
accepted Order of $ab$ if $a$ and $b$ commute and $\langle a\rangle\cap\langle b\rangle=\{1\}$
Feb
12
awarded  Student
Feb
12
comment Order of $ab$ if $a$ and $b$ commute and $\langle a\rangle\cap\langle b\rangle=\{1\}$
Thank you, I was looking at the whole problem incorrectly. Thanks to everyones' comments, I see what I actually need to do. $\langle ab\rangle$ would contain $(ab)^1, (ab)^2, $ ... . So, by using the fact that it's commutative, you can get $ab, a^2 b^2, $... . So, if you have $(ab)^k$, if $k$ is a multiple of m, then $a = e$, and if $k$ is a multiple of $n$, then $b = e$, so to get $a = b = e$, $k$ would need to be a multiple of both $a$ and $b$. Thus the order is lcm($m$, $n$). Now all I have left to do is fine a counter-example.
Feb
12
comment Order of $ab$ if $a$ and $b$ commute and $\langle a\rangle\cap\langle b\rangle=\{1\}$
Arturo Magidin I'll add the [homework] tag from now on, thank you. Dylan Moreland I see what you mean. $\langle ab\rangle$; would contain $ab$, $(ab)^2$, ... . $(ab)^2 = (ab)(ab) = a^2 b^2$ (because of commutativity). Ok, I think I have a new approach to solving this problem than before, thank you!
Feb
12
asked Order of $ab$ if $a$ and $b$ commute and $\langle a\rangle\cap\langle b\rangle=\{1\}$