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Oct
21
answered Fundamental solution of heat equation on a compact Riemannian manifold
Oct
21
comment Uniform convergence of the power series except at the point 1.
Just a comment on why looking at $(1-z)\sum a_kz^k$ is reasonable: It is the same trick as in how you would compute $1+\ldots+z^n$. You have now coefficients in front of $z^k$, but it turns out harmless if they are decreasing.
Oct
13
awarded  Yearling
Oct
9
reviewed Close Show that the curve has only one point
Oct
9
reviewed Close Does differential equation always has solution if vector field is only continuous?
Oct
9
reviewed Close Convergence of $\sum_{k=2}^\infty \frac{1}{k(\log k)^x}$
Oct
9
reviewed Close Converting partial DE to integral Equation
Oct
9
reviewed Approve suggested edit on word-problem tag wiki
Oct
9
reviewed Approve suggested edit on word-problem tag wiki excerpt
Oct
8
reviewed Close Is ABC an equilateral triangle
Oct
8
reviewed Close maximal subtorus of a connected commutative algebraic linear group
Oct
8
reviewed Close $m\{x\in [0,1]:f'(x)=0\}>0$
Oct
8
reviewed Close Does the supremum is finite?
Oct
8
reviewed Leave Closed How ae these three order types on $Z_+ \times Z_+$ different?
Oct
8
comment Norm independent solution for partial differential eqution
If I understand the problem correctly, you just take $f=0$ or $g=0$ to get "travelling wave" solutions. The norms of these obviously do not depend on time.
Oct
8
answered Am I just not smart enough?
Oct
8
comment Property of analytic functions?
It is not clear what you are asking. Can you please phrase the question in a self contained manner?
Oct
8
comment Proof of reflection principle for harmonic functions
Yes, if you know about the mean value property, it actually works for continuous functions as well. That is, continuous functions satisfying the mean value property are harmonic, and in particular, automatically smooth.
Oct
8
comment Proof of reflection principle for harmonic functions
How do you prove when $u\in C^2$ ?
Oct
8
reviewed Close How do I solve an equation with three terms, with the unknown inside a square root, inside a third root, in two of them?