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Feb
26
awarded  Commentator
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
@Derek Jennings: +1 Thanks!
Feb
26
awarded  Supporter
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
+1 Funny thing is, your answer makes sense to me -- the answer and question linked to as a duplicate... does not - oh, well.
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
@Qiaochu Yuan: +1 thanks, did search for a duplicate first, and figured there might be one - I'll take a look at the question you linked to. Cheers!
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
@Mike Spivey: +1 Thanks for the edits to the question.
Feb
26
revised Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
deleted 61 characters in body
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
@Ross Millikan: Updated the core question per Moron's suggestion, and removed the secondary question deal with any reasons why Pi might not be a constant. Have any additional feedback? Thanks!
Feb
26
awarded  Editor
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
@Sunil: Updated my question to Moron's wording, since he's meaning was the intent of my question.
Feb
26
comment Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
@Moron: Yes, that's correct -- updated the question, thanks!
Feb
26
revised Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
edited title
Feb
26
asked Why is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter independent of the circle?
Feb
18
comment Is there a online reference that chains mathematical knowledge from simple to complex?
@Orbling: Cool, Bitesize, while not what I was thinking would be an answer is viewable from the States, and looks like a great starting point -- thanks. Also, we've run across each other before... again, thanks for sharing!! google.com/search?q=%2BOrbling+%2Bblunders
Feb
18
comment Is there a online reference that chains mathematical knowledge from simple to complex?
@: On an unrelated note, find it very, very interesting that you've up-voted 267 questions (0 down votes) -- and aside from my question, never asked or answered any other questions... :-) ...at least on math.stackexchange -- so, again, thanks for posting! (FYI, just recalled I don't have the rep here to up vote an answer to my own question, oh, well. +1 in spirit...)
Feb
18
comment Is there a online reference that chains mathematical knowledge from simple to complex?
@Orbling: +1 Thanks for posting. To answer your question, I really do know nothing beyond ad-doc info; meaning if I was to take a math test, I'd fail even on basic knowledge questions. That said, my interest is as stated, a resource that will help me access and gauge the requirements related to a given topic. For example, I would not see the basics of said reference as 1+1, but as the axioms of math; which paradoxical proves I know more about math than most people that know nothing about math. I really am looking for what I'm looking for as stated.
Feb
18
awarded  Student
Feb
18
asked Is there a online reference that chains mathematical knowledge from simple to complex?