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Jun
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awarded  Nice Question
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Mar
28
comment Sum of all integers
No. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riemann_series_theorem. The -1/12 thing is just a sensationalistic thing that crops up every now and then which is always taken out of context of zeta-renormalized math/physics.
Feb
26
awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Notable Question
Dec
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Sep
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Feb
20
comment Smallest next real number after an integer
Basically, your post here was dismissed due to the connection with real numbers. They aren't real numbers. And just a representation has no meaning until you add some extra juice to it.
Feb
20
comment Smallest next real number after an integer
@user124384 Because the number system there isn't fully defined. It's not the real numbers, in the first place. There are a number of artificial number systems that that representation can accept, it's more of a seed of an idea than a fully fleshed out idea. Some are well ordered, some are not. I managed to get a well-ordered number system out of it here by giving a meaning to the less than/greater than signs. But whatever it is, it's not the real numbers.
Feb
20
comment Smallest next real number after an integer
You might enjoy the kaufman decimals
Nov
16
comment Why can't you square both sides of an equation?
The issue here is distinct from the one in the question, here the square root symbol (which is a function that denotes the positive square root) is being misused in the problem. Squaring both sides of a consistent equation will only make you gain solutions, not lose them.
Nov
15
suggested rejected edit on Problem in Hamiltonian system
Nov
7
answered Smallest integer x s.t. x! congruent to 0 (mod 216)
Nov
4
revised Can we construct Sturm Liouville problems from an orthogonal basis of functions?
added 722 characters in body
Nov
4
comment Can we construct Sturm Liouville problems from an orthogonal basis of functions?
@DavidH Hahaha as a physics student myself, usually I'm certain of these things too, but mathematicians don't seem to like such happy-go-lucky certainty. I was looking for caveats to the general "reverse Sturm Liouville problem".
Nov
4
revised Can we construct Sturm Liouville problems from an orthogonal basis of functions?
added 6 characters in body; edited title
Nov
4
comment Can we construct Sturm Liouville problems from an orthogonal basis of functions?
@DavidH Ah, makes sense. Are we sure that such a Sturm-Liouville problem must exist in the first place?
Nov
4
asked Can we construct Sturm Liouville problems from an orthogonal basis of functions?
Oct
28
comment 31,331,3331, 33331,333331,3333331,33333331 are prime
@JasonC And me, coming from Physics (where we restrict questions to conceptual ones and disallow HW), would downvote 90% of SO's questions and answers, as almost all of the questions on SO fit the Physics description of HW (and the answers are our description of "doing HW for the OP") ;-) Of course, I don't do that :P