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  • 118 votes cast
Jul
28
answered Surprising Generalizations
Jul
28
comment What is the deepest / most interesting known connection between Trigonometry and Statistics?
Here is a link to a similar answer to someone else's question, namely, asking for surprising generalizations: math.stackexchange.com/questions/1352/…
Jul
28
comment Surprising Generalizations
This is similar to one of the answers to a question that I asked here: math.stackexchange.com/questions/39283/…
Jul
28
accepted What is the deepest / most interesting known connection between Trigonometry and Statistics?
Jul
14
comment Proof that $\sum\limits_{k=1}^nk^2 = \frac{n(n+1)(2n+1)}{6}$?
@Zev Chonoles: And do you still agree that 3 down votes is still appropriate for my answer?
Jul
12
comment Proof that $\sum\limits_{k=1}^nk^2 = \frac{n(n+1)(2n+1)}{6}$?
@Zev Chonoles: So you think everything of value has been loaded onto the web? You have the faith of a Breton peasant. Anyway, the Bernoulli numbers are implicit in the formula that I cited, and I added a link giving the justification of the formula.
Jul
10
comment Math without infinity
At the very least, you would be giving up great convenience, and convenience rules in Mathematics as fiercely as anywhere. The essential contribution is always made by the outsider. This is the practical import of Godel’s famous theorem (i.e., that every non-trivial system is either inconsistent or incomplete). For example, the hero of a story is typically an outsider (e.g., Shane). This was part of the appeal of Paul Newman: he (i.e., the character he portrayed), as one reviewer remarked, was the perpetual outsider.
Jul
10
revised Summation formula name
deleted 8 characters in body
Jul
10
revised Proof that $\sum\limits_{k=1}^nk^2 = \frac{n(n+1)(2n+1)}{6}$?
added link to justification on 10.Jul.2011
Jul
4
comment Why can ALL quadratic equations be solved by the quadratic formula?
@Peter Taylor: It adds perspective. It suggests, with a light touch, that the OP has not struggled with this question nearly enough before presenting it to the community. (This will probably come back to haunt me later, but anyway...) So, I'm upvoting this answer.
Jul
4
comment Summation formula name
Could someone please edit the formula for me so that the integrand of the first integral on the RHS is simply “f”? (I am an advocate of dropping the extra baggage.) – and edit the formula so that the integrand of the second integral is “f’w”? Thanks. (I’m struggling with a Chinese operating system, and a lack of knowledge of whatever markup system the rest of you are using for writing mathematical formulas.)
Jul
3
asked Summation formula name
Jun
29
asked Enlightening misunderstandings of test questions
Jun
28
accepted Are magic squares inevitable?
Jun
28
comment Are magic squares inevitable?
You're talking about relative abundance, whereas I had in mind absolute abundance. Nonetheless, you make a good point, and I think your answer is the most relevant/spot-on/sobering of those given, and so am up-voting it and accepting it.
Jun
28
comment Are magic squares inevitable?
I want to thank everyone for their sobering comments and answers.
Jun
28
comment Are magic squares inevitable?
Flase results? No surprise there, as this is only a heuristic. But I appreciate the specific example you give, and so am up-voting your answer.
Jun
28
comment Are magic squares inevitable?
I did an edit to make it clear that there is to be no overlap between selections. In other words, we are dealing with "normal" magic squares.
Jun
28
revised Are magic squares inevitable?
made it clear that there is no overlap between selections
Jun
28
answered Proof that $\sum\limits_{k=1}^nk^2 = \frac{n(n+1)(2n+1)}{6}$?