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2d
revised How to prove $\frac{2^a+3}{2^a-9}$ is not a natural number
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revised How to prove $\frac{2^a+3}{2^a-9}$ is not a natural number
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revised How to prove $\frac{2^a+3}{2^a-9}$ is not a natural number
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revised How to prove $\frac{2^a+3}{2^a-9}$ is not a natural number
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comment How to prove $\frac{2^a+3}{2^a-9}$ is not a natural number
and $-12\not\geq 0$... !
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answered How to prove $\frac{2^a+3}{2^a-9}$ is not a natural number
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revised Points on 3d line
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revised Points on 3d line
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answered Points on 3d line
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comment What's special about the cauchy product?
In your second paragraph the multiplicands $\sum a_n$ and $\sum b_n$ are completely independent, e.g. you can write $C_n=\left(\sum a_k\right)\left(\sum b_k\right)$. That's trivial. The Cauchy product combines terms in a non-trivial way. Cauchy products can be useful.
Jul
27
revised evaluate $\frac 1{1+\sqrt2+\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1-\sqrt2+\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1+\sqrt2-\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1-\sqrt2-\sqrt3}$
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Jul
27
revised evaluate $\frac 1{1+\sqrt2+\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1-\sqrt2+\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1+\sqrt2-\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1-\sqrt2-\sqrt3}$
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Jul
27
answered evaluate $\frac 1{1+\sqrt2+\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1-\sqrt2+\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1+\sqrt2-\sqrt3} + \frac 1{1-\sqrt2-\sqrt3}$
Jul
23
revised Logarithmic Integral II
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Jul
23
answered Logarithmic Integral II
Jul
23
revised How to solve $z^3 + \overline z = 0$
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Jul
23
comment Does the series $\sum\limits_{n=1}^\infty \frac{1}{n\sqrt[n]{n}}$ converge?
+1 very simple !
Jul
23
revised Simple Logarithms Equation
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Jul
23
comment Simple Logarithms Equation
Assuming $x\in\mathbb{R}$, and since $3^x>0$ for all $x\in\mathbb{R}$, then $3-x>0$ which implies $x<3$.
Jul
22
comment If I buy 2 lottery tickets do I double my chance of winning?
Which gives $$\frac{1}{{49\choose 6}}=0.00000007151123842...$$ I'd better get a better paid job.