197 reputation
29
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen yesterday

May
13
accepted What is “tetrad twist” in relation to Rubik's cubes?
May
13
answered What is “tetrad twist” in relation to Rubik's cubes?
Apr
5
asked What is “tetrad twist” in relation to Rubik's cubes?
Apr
4
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
22
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
8
awarded  Teacher
Jul
8
answered Big List of Fun Math Books
Jun
7
awarded  Editor
Jun
7
revised How can you add 'not G' to a formal system without introducing omega inconsistency?
edited body
Jun
6
accepted “Flattening” a 2D Normal Distribution
Jun
6
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
3
comment “Flattening” a 2D Normal Distribution
So, just to confirm, the $\sigma$ in your Rayleigh pdf function is the same variable as the $\sigma$ that represents the standard deviation of the initial normal distributions, right?
Jun
3
asked “Flattening” a 2D Normal Distribution
Apr
16
accepted How can you add 'not G' to a formal system without introducing omega inconsistency?
Apr
16
comment How can you add 'not G' to a formal system without introducing omega inconsistency?
Okay, thank you very much for your response! I think I have a much better handle on the situation now.
Apr
16
awarded  Commentator
Apr
16
comment How can you add 'not G' to a formal system without introducing omega inconsistency?
Excuse my ignorance, but what exactly is a "closed term", and why would omega-prime-consistency be undesirable?
Apr
16
comment How can you add 'not G' to a formal system without introducing omega inconsistency?
@ArturoMagidin, yes, sorry I didn't make myself clear - when I said "for all a", I didn't mean that was part of the theorem that was proven, rather that, from the "outside", it is apparent that we can prove $\neg P(a)$ individually for every natural number a.