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comment I need some help with this standard deviation and mean question!! please I really need to understand this
Make titles informative and avoid 'desperate' requests for help, please.
2h
comment If the localizations of two submodules with respect to any prime ideal are equal then the submodules are equal
@user26857 I cannot understand your objection here. Where do you see a problem?
11h
revised If the localizations of two submodules with respect to any prime ideal are equal then the submodules are equal
edited body
11h
answered If the localizations of two submodules with respect to any prime ideal are equal then the submodules are equal
12h
revised Is there a term for an “unbounded simplex”?
edited tags
2d
revised How to figure out how many entries are in a relation
rolled back to a previous revision
Apr
15
revised Addition and subtraction error
added 2 characters in body
Apr
14
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
14
comment When is a group isomorphic to a proper subgroup of itself?
@Pacman In the infinite case, there's no guarantee. Take $\Bbb Z$ and the proper isomorphic subgroup $2\Bbb Z$.
Apr
14
comment When is a group isomorphic to a proper subgroup of itself?
No, there isn't.
Apr
13
revised Conjugacy classes of the group $G=\langle a,b\mid a^6=1,b^2=a^3,bab^{-1}=a^{-1} \rangle$
edited body
Apr
13
comment Conjugacy classes of the group $G=\langle a,b\mid a^6=1,b^2=a^3,bab^{-1}=a^{-1} \rangle$
@AndreasCaranti Yes, that's a typo. Thanks.
Apr
13
awarded  ring-theory
Apr
13
comment What does the term “undefined” actually mean?
Do not make edits unless absolutely necessary. In particular, changing "mathematics" to "maths" is not absolutely necessary!
Apr
12
comment Maximal ideal of $\mathbb{R}[x]$
@abcd1234 Yes, it is a maximal ideal, but not the maximal ideal. For example, $(X-1)$ is another, and $(X^2+1)$ is yet another. In fact, maximal ideals correspond bijectively up to unit multipliers to the irreducible polynomials in $\Bbb R[X]$.
Apr
12
comment Geometric understanding of why $D_1\cong \mathbb{Z}_2$
No, $D_1$ is a group with two elements.
Apr
12
revised Conjugacy classes of the group $G=\langle a,b\mid a^6=1,b^2=a^3,bab^{-1}=a^{-1} \rangle$
deleted 43 characters in body
Apr
12
comment Conjugacy classes of the group $G=\langle a,b\mid a^6=1,b^2=a^3,bab^{-1}=a^{-1} \rangle$
@NickyHekster Perfect. =)
Apr
12
comment Conjugacy classes of the group $G=\langle a,b\mid a^6=1,b^2=a^3,bab^{-1}=a^{-1} \rangle$
@NickyHekster You're right. $D_6$ (with $6$ elements) is centerless. Let's fix that argument then...
Apr
12
comment Geometric understanding of why $D_1\cong \mathbb{Z}_2$
Some authors denote the dihedral group of order $2n$ by $D_n$.