887 reputation
423
bio website math.utep.edu/faculty/…
location El Paso, TX
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 12 hours ago

Computational Science PhD student
University of Texas El Paso
Climate & Energy Science Student Organization President
National Energy Technology Laboratory Intern
NSF LSAMP Fellow


13h
comment Convected 2nd order tensor in component form
Regardless, I think this question is best suited for the Math SE site, since it is primarily focused on understanding the notation rather than any computational method.
17h
comment Convected 2nd order tensor in component form
I'm not quite sure I understand your notation convention... As I recall, the gradient of a tensor is a rank 3 tensor. If $v$ is a vector, then how is $v\cdot\nabla a$ defined?
Oct
16
comment Notation for the “scalarization” of a vector with a single non-zero entry
That's so simple and it works! Thanks!
Jun
21
comment Is computer science a branch of mathematics?
@ApprenticeQueue: Isn't all mathematics essentially a collection of reductionist arguments?
Mar
20
comment Weird Al Yankovic's Partial Differential Equation
Interesting. Does the expression $4\pi\epsilon_0=1$ mean anything, physically?
Mar
20
comment Weird Al Yankovic's Partial Differential Equation
Is this formulated as an eigenvalue problem?
Feb
25
comment Is computer science a branch of mathematics?
@sashang: It is difficult to say one way or another if this is an oversimplification or not without establishing a rigorous and unambiguous definition of the word "branch" as it is applied by the OP's question. If you can provide such a definition, I can respond to your "oversimplification" claim more adequately, one way or another.
Feb
13
comment Is computer science a branch of mathematics?
@SpYk3HH: The point is that the lines are blurred nonetheless, in spite of what most people believe of both subjects.
Jan
24
comment Is computer science a branch of mathematics?
Do you seek a philosophical answer?
Dec
26
comment On “familiarity” (or How to avoid “going down the Math Rabbit Hole”?)
An elegantly succinct and informative answer using analogies from computer science! Kudos to you!
Nov
18
comment Incremental averageing
Can you elaborate on why precision errors are smaller in the second expression? Does the first expression contain a subtraction of nearly equal values?
Jul
31
comment Obtaining a bound on the differential operator
This almost makes sense. But the left hand side of the inequality uses $\frac{du}{dy}$, not $\left| \frac{du}{dy}\right|$. Unless it is somehow implicitly assumed that $\frac{du}{dy}>0$, I just can't see how we can conclude this.
Jul
12
comment Explaining the physical meaning of an eigenvalue in a real world problem
The question is about understanding and interpreting the eigenvalues/eigenvectors, not finding a method to solve the equation.
Jul
11
comment Explaining the physical meaning of an eigenvalue in a real world problem
@AsalBeagDubh: Whatever it takes to confer your doctorate is worth it, even vodka with beer! :)
Jul
11
comment Explaining the physical meaning of an eigenvalue in a real world problem
@AsalBeagDubh: I edited the question for consistency, replacing all instances of 'rum' with 'beer'.
Jul
10
comment Factorizing a saddle point operator
@ShuhaoCao: It is the divergence operator, but my current formulation is continuous, not discrete. For simplicity, I'm currently considering a 1D case where the divergence and gradient operators are equivalent. In the future, I'd like to consider higher dimensional cases where $u_1$ is, in fact, vector valued.
Jul
10
comment Factorizing a saddle point operator
@RobertLewis: LU is not favorable because the resulting discrete linear operator is large. I'm trying to avoid a large solve by splitting the continuous operator before discretizing the system.
Jun
4
comment Laplace equation with periodic boundary conditions
@Landscape: Sounds fair enough :)
Jun
4
comment Laplace equation with periodic boundary conditions
@Landscape: Indeed, this is what I suspected. But what of the form of the solutions? Are all solutions scalar shifts of each other if the periodic neumann condition is not imposed?
Jun
4
comment Laplace equation with periodic boundary conditions
@Landscape: Of course!