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seen Mar 7 at 12:35

Aug
15
comment Derivative of step functions
@JoeJohnson126 Yes, that is what I am asking. And besides that, what is derivative of any individual f (since f is a limit of functions $\lim_{n \rightarrow \infty} f_n(x)$) what is ${f'}_n(x)$ ?
Aug
15
comment Derivative of step functions
Yes, that link illustrates exactly what I mean. With the difference that where I assumed the derivative was infinite, it actually wasn't defined. And this brings me to my question: given that derivative, how can it's integral (Lebesgue or otherwise) be any other value than 0?
Aug
15
comment Derivative of step functions
The derivative of step functions. Because as I said, it seems to me that the classical approach (The one used together with Riemann-Darboux) would yield a derivative with a range of ${0, \infty, -\infty}$.
Aug
15
comment Derivative of step functions
Is it more clear now?
Aug
15
revised Derivative of step functions
clarification
Aug
15
asked Derivative of step functions
Aug
15
comment How do Taylor polynomials work to approximate functions?
Absolutely awesome visualizations, thanks for the link!
Aug
15
revised How do Taylor polynomials work to approximate functions?
added 399 characters in body
Aug
15
answered How do Taylor polynomials work to approximate functions?
Aug
14
revised Help in understanding integration by changing the variable
added 104 characters in body; edited title
Aug
14
comment Help in understanding integration by changing the variable
And any tips on which to choose as $f(x)$ and which as $g'(x)$ or something?
Aug
14
asked Help in understanding integration by changing the variable
Aug
13
accepted Question about continuous functions and indefinite integrals
Aug
13
comment Question about continuous functions and indefinite integrals
Ah, it seems that the book wasn't clear enoug. Yes there are functions that satisfy those conditions, but what I was reffering to was that there is no way of expressing it in elementary terms. And isn't $0^0 = 0$ and if not, then I can ask about $[0.5, 1]$ there still isn't an elementary way to express it.
Aug
13
asked Question about continuous functions and indefinite integrals
Jan
14
comment The accumulation points for Dirichlet's function
Yes, I think you're right. I'm relatively new to Real Analysis, and english is not my native language (the books are not in english) so sometimes the terms get jumbled up.
Jan
14
comment The accumulation points for Dirichlet's function
Accumulation point, apparently in English they're also called limit points.
Jan
14
comment The accumulation points for Dirichlet's function
Yes, here it is link
Jan
14
revised The accumulation points for Dirichlet's function
added 170 characters in body
Jan
14
asked The accumulation points for Dirichlet's function