10,913 reputation
21136
bio website math.berkeley.edu/~cawong
location Berkeley, CA
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 17 hours ago

I am a fourth-year mathematics graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.

I graduated with a B.S. in Applied and Computational Mathematics from the California Institute of Technology.

My general mathematical interests include applied functional analysis, numerical analysis, harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, numerical linear algebra, and mathematical and computational biology, chemistry, and physics.


Oct
22
comment What does $b^*$ mean?
They just mean that $b$ and $b^*$ are two different vectors. No relationship between them.
Oct
22
reviewed No Action Needed Irrational numbers and proving constant functions
Oct
22
reviewed No Action Needed Cauchy construction of the real numbers.
Oct
21
comment Regarding Linear Subspaces over a Finite Field… TFAE:
It might be fruitful to think about orthogonal complements (or, more precisely for this problem, annihilators).
Oct
21
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Calculate integral of $\ln(z)$ using the residue theorem
Oct
21
comment Regarding Linear Subspaces over a Finite Field… TFAE:
What have you tried?
Oct
20
answered Convergence of functions in a metric space
Oct
12
answered What is the dimension for this subspace?
Oct
10
answered Show $\ell_\infty (M)$ is a Banach Space
Oct
6
comment Understanding $\Delta(\vert f \vert ^p)$ when $f$ is holomorphic, $p>0.$
I've added an additional hint to clarify. So, in essence, you act the holomorphic and anti-holomorphic derivatives on $f$ and $\bar{f}$ separately, and then combine at the end. This will avoid any need to "unravel" the expression in terms of real and imaginary parts.
Oct
6
revised Understanding $\Delta(\vert f \vert ^p)$ when $f$ is holomorphic, $p>0.$
further hint
Oct
6
answered Understanding $\Delta(\vert f \vert ^p)$ when $f$ is holomorphic, $p>0.$
Sep
30
reviewed Close Verify the Identity
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
25
comment Prove that Autonomous are invariant under time translation
$\varphi(z = 0) = \varphi(t_0)$.
Sep
22
comment Constructing a sequence of function with bounded derivative
Do you mean to say that you require $f_n$ to have uniformly bounded third derivative with respect to $n$?
Sep
17
comment Why does the discrete cosine transform compact the information at the “low frequencies”?
The rank of a matrix is the dimension of its column space. For generic values of the entries, an $n \times n$ matrix always has rank $n$. However, it might be very close in value to another $n \times n$ matrix whose rank is much less than $n$. This is the assumption used when one does a compression.
Sep
16
answered Why does the discrete cosine transform compact the information at the “low frequencies”?
Sep
11
reviewed Leave Open I lost my love of math; I'm getting it back. How can I determine if math is actually right for me?
Sep
11
reviewed Close Converting non-continuous angle to 360