11,331 reputation
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bio website math.berkeley.edu/~cawong
location Berkeley, CA
age 25
visits member for 3 years
seen yesterday

I am a fourth-year mathematics graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.

I graduated with a B.S. in Applied and Computational Mathematics from the California Institute of Technology.

My general mathematical interests include applied functional analysis, numerical analysis, harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, numerical linear algebra, and mathematical and computational biology, chemistry, and physics.


2d
comment Definition of gradient?
It is equal to that, yes. I would hesitate to say it is defined by that, though. The derivative is always defined as the linear approximation of the function.
2d
answered Definition of gradient?
Jan
19
comment Convolution of two indicator functions can't be constant
What does a convolution mean for an arbitrary measure space?
Jan
10
comment Prove that a limit in two variables does not exists
Right, for a limit to exist, you must get the same 'limiting' value when approaching from any direction. You've shown that for two different directions, you get different values, so the limit doesn't exist.
Jan
10
comment Prove that a limit in two variables does not exists
You might want to take a closer look at the last case ($x = y$) you wrote down.
Jan
8
revised Why do some accept zero as a natural number but others don't?
deleted 10 characters in body
Jan
7
comment Innocent looking open problems in real analysis
I do not know how low-level you're looking for, but I remember learning about the Invariant subspace problem and thinking it was very simple to understand. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invariant_subspace_problem
Jan
7
comment 'Smaller than infinity' notation
A fully correct way to say that $A$ converges and is finite is to say "$A$ exists and $A \in \mathbb{R}$".
Jan
7
answered Why do some accept zero as a natural number but others don't?
Dec
31
awarded  Yearling
Dec
30
comment Why do complex eigenvalues correspond to a rotation of the vector?
Do you know why multiplying two complex numbers together can be interpreted as a rotation?
Dec
19
awarded  Constituent
Dec
19
comment Using Mean Value Theorem to Prove Derivative Greater than Zero
Use the MVT with $f(x) - f((a + x)/2)$
Dec
19
answered Using Mean Value Theorem to Prove Derivative Greater than Zero
Dec
14
comment Differentiation in Banach space
It may useful to use the fact that if you already know that $F$ is supposed to have a Frechet derivative, then it must coincide with its Gateaux derivative. This may make it easier to compute the derivative.
Dec
9
reviewed Reject On the definition of Markov chains
Dec
9
reviewed Approve Proving $A^2 = 0$ given $A^5 = 0$
Dec
9
reviewed Leave Open random walk on finite cyclic group
Dec
9
reviewed Close I am going mixed
Dec
9
reviewed Close Solving this second order differential equation (Damping mechanism)