181 reputation
3
bio website none
location United States
age 21
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Feb 5 at 19:47

Now majoring in math, linguistics, and Asian studies, with a concentration in Japanese, at University of Tennessee, with minors in English, German, history, and computer science.

I read a lot, and all over the place, content-wise. I also have a bad tendency to use German grammar in my English writing...which actually works pretty well for me.

It's not my fault I was only formally exposed to grammar when I started learning German.

Calculus is totally sexy, and I would probably marry Gottfried Leibnitz if he were still alive. And just to cement my awesome dorkiness to the world: I decided I wanted to study linguistics after I read The Lord of the Rings and found out Tolkien was a philologist. That was the only reason I ever went on a language kick. Before that I was an art/history nerd, with emphasis on the art. Who knows why?

Fate is inexorable.


Mar
29
comment When should I use “graph” vs. “plot”?
Yeah, I'm tired and writing a German essay while listening to Korean music. Who knows where my brain's at? Apparently not where I keep my definition of continuity. Editing, and probably not for the last time...Also, plotting all of the points of a function whose domain is all real numbers would take a while...
Mar
29
answered When should I use “graph” vs. “plot”?
Mar
29
comment When should I use “graph” vs. “plot”?
@mgb: It's possible. I would understand "plot y as a function of x," but it sounds a little funny to me. I would use "graph" there preferentially. Still, I would understand it. It could also be a math/physics thing. My calc III professor never tires of warning us about the inherent dangers of using physicists' notation. XP I'm sure he'd be happy to extend it to language. :)
Mar
28
comment When should I use “graph” vs. “plot”?
That's my impression, but I have nothing to back it up except my own observations, which is why I left a comment instead of an answer.
Mar
28
comment When should I use “graph” vs. “plot”?
...In all of my math classes (I'm a math major), we talk about plotting points, but we graph functions. You can plot specific points in the graph of a function, but you don't just plot a function. Generally, plot, as a noun, refers to a set of points that may or may not be connected by a line, but that cannot be represented as a function. I don't know if there's some technical ground behind this, but if there is, one of us is being confused...
Jan
13
awarded  Supporter
Jul
28
answered How to get an equation that output the end point of an angle line in rectangle?
Jul
28
awarded  Teacher
Jul
28
answered What does it mean to be going 40 mph (or 64 kph, etc.) at a given moment?
Jul
27
awarded  Autobiographer