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seen Aug 26 at 7:51

Yes.


Mar
17
awarded  Supporter
Mar
17
answered Complex numbers and Nonstandard Analysis
Mar
17
awarded  Editor
Mar
17
revised Superstructure with sets as atomic/base entities
added 20 characters in body
Mar
17
comment Superstructure with sets as atomic/base entities
Thanks for the response. To clarify, I mean "in" to denote set membership, so $R \in X$. Also, I mean an n-ary relation to generally be a set of n-tuples. So as we've now both said, if $R \in X$, the domain and range of $R$ are not necessarily in $V(X)$. So how is this situation dealt with? Any relations in $X$ are special wrt $V(X)$ -- they don't have the same properties as the other relations in $V(X)$. So what are they called or how are they treated?
Mar
16
awarded  Student
Mar
16
asked Superstructure with sets as atomic/base entities
Jan
12
awarded  Scholar
Jan
12
accepted Topological spaces as model-theoretic structures — definitions?
Jan
11
comment Topological spaces as model-theoretic structures — definitions?
@Brian Right, thanks. I was just wondering if the same could not be accomplished in a one-sorted language with regular set membership. Also, I am not sure how to mark my question as answered if no one leaves a separate answer.
Jan
11
comment Topological spaces as model-theoretic structures — definitions?
@ZhenLin Thanks!
Jan
10
comment Topological spaces as model-theoretic structures — definitions?
Thank you. I was just curious what a structure would look like. I'm not sure if a topology is necessarily a set, but is the idea to let the domain be the union of X, P(X), and P(P(X)), so the topologies will just be individuals? I don't understand the point of the R and S binary relations; are these just for the different sorts
Jan
10
asked Topological spaces as model-theoretic structures — definitions?