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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Aug 24 at 3:56

Jul
2
comment How would you count a base > 36 system?
@user87690: ah, my mistake, yes you're correct, it should actually be base 256.
Jul
2
comment How would you count a base > 36 system?
IPv4 for example is 4 digits of base 255, traditionally denoted as dot separated base 10 numbers (e.g. 255.255.255.255). IPv6 took a similar approach, though the notation is slightly different, with 6 digits of colon separated base 16 numbers (e.g. ff:ee:dd:cc:bb:aa). This is a practical system that can scale to arbitrarily large bases without having to memorize/invent new symbols.
Jun
23
comment If A = B, then B = A… Not Always True? Definition of “=”
In standard math parlance, "=" refers to the equality relation which is an equivalence relation and should always be properly spelled out as "is equal to" or "equals", rather than just "is". Using plain "is" is a poor form because in English "is" can refer to both equality relation or subset relation. Now that that's cleared up, equivalence relation is defined to be a relation which is reflexive. A relation R is said to be reflexive if it holds that if aRb then bRa for all a and b.
Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Aug
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
23
revised Prove that the additive inverse of an odd integer is an odd integer
added 8 characters in body
Jun
23
comment Prove that the additive inverse of an odd integer is an odd integer
I like the simplicity of this approach. Pedantic: you still also need to prove the base case.
Jun
23
answered Prove that the additive inverse of an odd integer is an odd integer
May
12
awarded  Nice Answer
May
4
comment A “simple” 3rd grade problem…or is it?
You should all know that in these kind of tests, picture is not drawn to scale. That image is actually an image of a board drawn with altered scale to fool students that trued using rulers to get the answer.
Apr
25
answered How to entertain a crowd with mathematics?
Mar
8
answered Comparing $2013!$ and $1007^{2013}$
Feb
18
comment Where are the values of the sine function coming from?
@JackM: I don't think the sin is the only solution that that differential equation. Case in point, $f(x) = 0$, $f'(x) = 0$, $f''(x) = 0$, and $-f''(x) = 0$ is also $f = -f''$. It would not be a good way to define a function.
Jan
18
answered Can you provide me historical examples of pure mathematics becoming “useful”?
Jan
7
revised Formalizing the idea of “algorithm”
added 72 characters in body
Jan
7
awarded  Revival
Jan
7
answered Formalizing the idea of “algorithm”
Jan
7
comment Formalizing the idea of “algorithm”
In most formal definitions of algorithm must always have a "terminating condition", i.e. a condition that when reached will mark the end of the algorithm, e.g. when a certain character is found in the sequence (e.g. EOF or your α). A sequence of steps that does not have a terminating condition is usually called computational method/computational process.
Dec
12
comment Does multiplying polynomials ever decrease the number of terms?
If you meant by number of terms as degree, then no, multiplying polynomials would never decrease the degree of the resulting polynomial. If you meant by number of terms as in the number of non-zero coefficients, then others have given examples where it does happen.
Nov
26
comment Can every proof by contradiction also be shown without contradiction?
I usually see the proof stated as the following: Suppose there is only a finite number of primes and ALLPRIME contains all primes in existence. Then ... proof that there exist another number p which is a prime but not in ALLPRIME ... This is a contradiction so there are infinitely many primes. which is a proof by contradiction. I've never seen it presented the way you present it.