416 reputation
1317
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location Canada
age 20
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jul 23 at 13:06

Hello, StackExchange!

I'm just another programmer, albeit one who only likes low level stuff mostly. My preferred background and preference is in C, with some C++. I have some math background in Calculus and Linear algebra.


Jul
18
suggested suggested edit on The sum of $1^2+7^2+13^2+\cdots+n^2,$ where $ n =1 \mod6 $
Jul
18
revised How to solve a system of three nonlinear equation in a simple way
grammar, spelling.
Jul
18
suggested suggested edit on How to solve a system of three nonlinear equation in a simple way
Jul
17
suggested suggested edit on sum of the series $\sum_{k=0}^{\infty}(k+1)(1-|x_k|)|x_n|^k$
Jul
14
comment Using the Chain Rule to prove trig derivatives
@YvesDaoust I see, that makes sense.
Jul
14
comment Using the Chain Rule to prove trig derivatives
@YvesDaoust Really? Why? I've never seen the $\circ$ for my derivatives when doing them in class/examples.
Jul
14
awarded  Cleanup
Jul
14
revised Using the Chain Rule to prove trig derivatives
rolled back to a previous revision
Jul
14
revised Using the Chain Rule to prove trig derivatives
deleted 5 characters in body
Jul
14
awarded  Yearling
Jul
14
revised Discrete Math and non-empty relations
some formatting?
Jul
14
suggested suggested edit on Discrete Math and non-empty relations
Jul
14
answered Using the Chain Rule to prove trig derivatives
Jul
14
comment Explaining Infinite Sets and The Fault in Our Stars
@Raskolnikov what you mean by "double" I mean, to me say, 0.1111.. and 1.1111... they seem to be inherently different numbers?
Jul
14
comment Explaining Infinite Sets and The Fault in Our Stars
This is above my understanding, but... it seems that there should be more between 0 and 2? From my sense.
Jul
13
comment What do we lose by differentiating without using the rules of differential calculus?
It wouldn't be impossible, since you could just use the limit to get the derivative? More tedious, sure. But still possible.
Jul
13
comment What's this number called and what are its properties?
I honestly don't think it has a name...
Jul
13
comment Area of a Shape
@MarkBennet This seems like an ideal question, so I would assume the separator is infinitly thin.
Jul
13
comment Area of a Shape
@IHeartBunnies check my hint, you would want to solve in terms of r, if it doesn't give you a picture/more info.
Jul
13
comment Area of a Shape
@MPW Yes, they would mean area. It would simply depend on radius.