514 reputation
1311
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location Wellington, New Zealand
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 6 mins ago

I am an undergraduate computer science and mathematics student in New Zealand. My fields of interest are computer graphics, in particular the physics of light transport, and to some extent cryptography, as well as programming and software development in general.


Oct
16
asked Ideals of a field
Oct
6
comment Can I use Gödel numbering to prove a set is countable?
Thanks for your reply, I am accepting Hagen's answer but please know your answer was very helpful as well!
Oct
6
accepted Can I use Gödel numbering to prove a set is countable?
Oct
6
comment Can I use Gödel numbering to prove a set is countable?
Thanks for your answer, that makes sense. The fact you cite is not (yet?) known to us but it should be relatively easy to prove it.
Oct
6
asked Can I use Gödel numbering to prove a set is countable?
Sep
26
comment Prime number between n and (1+n!)
If by "large $n$" you mean "$n > 3$", then, sure..
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
6
comment What is the order of operations in trig functions?
@Semiclassical Agreed, in case of ambiguity always define your terms and there will be no problem :)
Sep
6
comment What is the order of operations in trig functions?
@Semiclassical True, though I usually see the exponent in brackets when indicating composition, e.g. $f^2(x) = (f(x))^2$ and $f^{(2)}(x) = (f \circ f)(x) = f(f(x))$. It should hopefully be clear from context in most cases though.
Sep
1
revised Integration of this type?
transcoded image into text and LaTeX to save bandwidth and space (also corrected relevent -> relevant)
Sep
1
suggested suggested edit on Integration of this type?
Aug
31
comment congruence issue
Once you've convinced yourself of that (or otherwise) you may then use $a^k \equiv (a \bmod n)^k \pmod{n}$ without further proof :)
Aug
25
comment Why does this work for $ i^{2i} $?
Hint: what is $i^2$? and do you know what $(a^b)^c$ equals?
Aug
6
comment In calculus, which questions can the naive ask that the learned cannot answer?
@Jasper No closed-form solution != cannot be numerically approximated to arbitrary accuracy by an algorithm (not necessarily involving table lookups)
Aug
2
comment Recognizing the sequence 1/16, 1/8, 3/16, 1/4, 5/16, …
Am I the only one who thought $\frac{1}{2}$ before reading the possible options? :)
Jul
22
comment What's wrong with my aproach to solving this equation with multiple logarithms?
@Deepak I thought the brackets made it explicit enough. What would be ambiguous is e.g. $\log a^b$, which is where people either specify $\log (a^b)$, or $(\log a)^b$, or $\log(a)^b$ (or, equivalently, $\log^b a$).
Jul
13
comment Proving 7n+5 is never a cubic number?
Another interesting variant on this: we know $x^6 \equiv 1 \pmod{7}$, ignoring the case that $x$ is divisible by 7 for now, thus $x^3 \equiv \pm 1 \pmod{7}$ because $7$ is prime. But $5 \not \equiv \pm 1 \pmod{7}$.
Jul
5
comment How to distinguish walking on a sphere or on a torus?
@Martijn Staple it to his tail? (sorry Omnomnomnom...)
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
26
comment Subtraction by addition
@Joker_vD I still don't know what is so wrong with the traditional carry/borrow method that motivates educators to constantly come up with convoluted and crippled "algorithms" to perform such a simple task.