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seen Apr 16 at 17:36

Apr
7
comment Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain
@gekkostate You're a bit off. f is the sum of multiple simple waves, all with different frequencies and phase angles. The fourier transform takes a complex wave from a given time period, and gives you the phase angles and frequencies of all of the component waves. f^ is the amplitude of each component wave.
Aug
31
comment What does it mean if a sequence is indexed beyond its bounds?
That's okay, I don't blame you :-) As far as I can tell, they don't explain it in the paper. I was hoping there was some common convention for this...
Aug
31
comment What does it mean if a sequence is indexed beyond its bounds?
It's on page 831 - I've edited my post to add this. The m in the double index indicates which of the intermediary sequences this is - I left it out of my description to simplify things. The n+1 only appears in the first index, so the second index didn't seem important.
Aug
31
revised What does it mean if a sequence is indexed beyond its bounds?
added 12 characters in body
Aug
31
asked What does it mean if a sequence is indexed beyond its bounds?
Sep
26
awarded  Scholar
Sep
26
awarded  Supporter
Sep
26
accepted Formally proving that a function is $O(x^n)$
Sep
25
comment Formally proving that a function is $O(x^n)$
@Moron: It's an algorithms class, so I'm used to assuming that $a > 0$, although now I realize that it's not appropriate for a question on a math site to exclude them. For the record, this isn't a specific homework question - I don't think anything given in my course will ever be this general.
Sep
25
awarded  Student
Sep
25
awarded  Editor
Sep
25
comment Formally proving that a function is $O(x^n)$
Looks fine to me. You missed one though -- I fixed it :-P
Sep
25
revised Formally proving that a function is $O(x^n)$
edited body
Sep
25
asked Formally proving that a function is $O(x^n)$