Reputation
Next tag badge:
97/100 score
49/20 answers
Badges
3 23 54
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~209k people reached

11h
reviewed Close Prove the nonzero elements in a field form a group under multiplication
11h
reviewed Close Stochastic process $X_t$, $X_t^2$, $X_{t^2}$
11h
reviewed Close Linear relationships
11h
reviewed Close list of all irreducible polynomials of degree at most n over the field $\mathbb Z/p\mathbb Z.$
11h
reviewed Close Two questions on the UK's Taught Course Networks
11h
reviewed Leave Open Estimate from above $\sum_{m=1}^{n-1}\frac{1}{n^\alpha-m^\alpha}$
11h
answered Is any simply connected domain conformally equivalent to Cartesian product of unit disks?
1d
comment why is $2.2250738585072014\text{e}{-308}$ not a number?
This is not a question about mathematics, but about how numbers are handled in a computer/calculator. (The IEE 754 format.)
1d
revised Understanding a Wermer's counterexample.
edited tags
1d
answered Understanding a Wermer's counterexample.
May
22
revised Find new generating function, given an arbitrary generating function
corrected LaTeX
May
22
answered Radius of convergence of power series of complex $\log$
May
22
comment Complex Variables1
What is $w$ (it should probably occur in the $\limsup$ condition)? Do you really want to tag this several-complex-variables? Do you really assume that $f$ is analytic on all of $G$? (In that case $f$ is bounded near $z_0$ and the second condition is meaningless). In the current state, this question is unanswerable.
May
21
comment Why can a function in $L^1(\partial \mathbb{D})$ be represented by a Fourier series?
@user122916 Since $f \in L^1$, $a_n$ is well-defined (without having to worry about distribution theory). But the corresponding series isn't necessarily convergent.
May
21
answered Can a complete pluripolar set be a single point?
May
20
answered Why can a function in $L^1(\partial \mathbb{D})$ be represented by a Fourier series?
May
20
answered Find the largest number for which a Laurent Series converges
May
20
comment Easy application of the Riemann Mapping Theorem
Just to clarify: The "stronger version" of Riemann's mapping theorem you need is Carathéodory's theorem.
May
20
comment Can Runge's approximating rat. fns. be required to take certain prescribed values?
Since $r_n \to f$ uniformly on $K$ implies that $r_n' \to f'$ uniformly on $K$, you can wiggle things around to match the derivatives in a similar way as above.
May
20
answered Normal families of holomorphic functions